Which are the quietest tube stations?

Oooh, spoooky. Liverpool Street in 1912. Image: Getty.

Every year, Transport for London publishes data for “entries and exits” for each tube station. These figures, which show the total number of people who pass through each tube station, enable us to see how busy each station is.

Or, in some cases not. Because the same figures also enable us to ask: which tube stations are used the least?

The answer for 2015, the most recent year for which figures are available, a beat of a cheat: Tufnell Park received by far the fewest visitors. But that doesn’t really count because it was closed all year so had no passengers whatsoever.

Ignoring that, then, the least busy tube stations are as follows:

10) Ruislip Gardens, Central line – 1.11m
9) Croxley, Metropolitan line – 1.05m
8) South Kenton, Bakerloo line – 0.95m
7) North Ealing, Piccadilly line – 0.89m
6) Moor Park, Metropolitan line – 0.88m
5) Chesham, Metropolitan line – 0.87m
4) Theydon Bois, Central line – 0.85m
3) Grange Hill, Central line – 0.65m
2) Chigwell, Central line – 0.55m
1) Roding Valley, Central line – 0.26m

These are mostly in the further reaches of suburbia on the Central and Metropolitan lines. Some of these stations, like Theydon Bois and Chesham, serve areas that are bordering on rural.

There are two exceptions to this. North Ealing, is in zone three; and South Kenton in zone four. Both of these, though, are in areas that are relatively well-stationed (if that's a word), and from which faster routes to central London are available:

Ealing.

Kenton.

Here's a map: we've imposed a tube roundel on each of the listed stations, so you can see at a glance where they are:

Click to expand, if you must.

Want more of this stuff? Follow CityMetric on Twitter or Facebook
 
 
 
 

Podcast: Global Britain and local Liverpool

Liverpool. Image: Getty.

This week, two disparate segments linked by the idea of trading with the world. Well, vaguely. It’s there, but you have to squint.

First up: I make my regular visit to the Centre for Cities office for the Ask the Experts slot with head of policy Paul Swinney. This week, he teaches me why cities need businesses that export internationally to truly thrive.

After that, we’re off to Liverpool, with New Statesman politics correspondent Patrick Maguire. He tells me why the local Labour party tried to oust mayor Joe Anderson; how the city became the party’s heartlands; and how it ended up with quite so many mayors.

The episode itself is below. You can subscribe to the podcast on AcastiTunes, or RSS. Enjoy.

Jonn Elledge is the editor of CityMetric. He is on Twitter as @jonnelledge and on Facebook as JonnElledgeWrites.

Skylines is produced by Nick Hilton.

Want more of this stuff? Follow CityMetric on Twitter or Facebook.