A man who got his bag caught in a tube train’s doors for 15 stops would like to know if there's a map to help him

Bank station, the scene of the crime. Image: Derwin/Pexels/creative commons.

Did you know that, at the northbound Northern line platforms on Bank tube station, the doors will open on the left hand side? But that at every station north of there, all the way to Edgware, the doors will open on the right?

Probably not, right? Even if you’re a tube nerd, who can draw the tube map from memory and has ruined a perfectly good night in the pub by boring on about the demise of the Northern Heights plan for hours – who pays attention to which side of the tube carriage the doors open? All the way along an entire line?

Well, Samir knows. Samir knows all too well. That’s because, just before 9 this morning, this happened:

Colindale is only two stops from the end of the line. Which, as it happens, is where Samir ended up.

Luckily, he can count on his family to be supportive.

 

For the record – looking at the Carto.Metro map of track layouts, we’re fairly sure that, had he only been on the High Barnet branch, Samir would have been able to escape his predicament at Camden Town. Sad!

Anyway, the reason we found out about all this is because Samir posed a question – one which we’ve been unable to answer:

Does anyone know of a version of the tube map which shows which side of the carriage the doors will open? If not, would anyone like to make one?

Get in touch. Enquiring minds trapped in tube carriages across the city want to know.

Incidentally, if you’re on Twitter, give Samir a follow will you? He’s had a hard day.

Jonn Elledge is the editor of CityMetric. He is on Twitter as @jonnelledge and on Facebook as JonnElledgeWrites.

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