The Liverpool metro just got its first new station in 20 years

The new Maghull North station. Image: Merseyrail.

Always nice when we get to report on a new bit of urban transport infrastructure outside London: the new station in Merseyside is hardly Crossrail, but it's a start.

The first trains reached Maghull North early this morning. The new station lies just north of, well, Maghull, on the Ormskirk branch of Merseyrail's Northern Line. Trains run to the eponymous West Lancashire town in one direction, and Liverpool Central in the other. (Only trains on the Southport branch of the Northern line continue south to Hunts Cross. Don't say we never reach you anything.)

Here's are some pictures of the new station, which looks adorably like it was built out of lego:

Plans for a station at Maghull, where a whole bunch of new housing is planned, have been on the table for more than a decade now. But its business case didn't win funding from the Liverpool City Region Combined authority until October 2016, and planning permission took another three months after that.

This is the first new station to open on the Merseyrail network since 1998, when it got two: Brunswick (just south of the city centre on the Northern line), and Conway Park (across the river, in downtown Birkenhead). Smartarses will try to tell you that other new stations have opened since – but Wavertree Technology Park, which opened in 2000, is only served by Northern Rail, and Liverpool South Parkway (2006) was actually an amalgamation of two existing stations at Allerton and Garston.

The network before Liverpool South Parkway, with its site circled. Click to expand. Image courtesy of Project Mapping.

The really exciting development, of course, would be for two new stations in the city centre to come off. Vauxhall lies to the north of the central business district, near to the site of the proposed new Everton Ground; St James lies to the south, in the Baltic Triangle creative district. Build both of those, and you'd end up with pretty comprehensive coverage of the Liverpool waterfront, as this map from our local correspondent Dave Mail shows:

Click to expand.

At present, both stations are just ideas in the authorities' eyes. But if Merseyrail is in a "building new stations" kind of a mood, then...

Anyway: I really just wanted to write something positive about train in the north of England. It’s been a while.

Jonn Elledge is the editor of CityMetric. He is on Twitter as @jonnelledge and on Facebook as JonnElledgeWrites

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In a world of autonomous vehicles, we’ll still need walking and cycling routes

A Surrey cycle path, 1936 style. Image: Getty.

The CEO of Sustrans on the limits of technology.

We are on the cusp of dramatic changes in the way we own, use and power our means of transportation. The mobility revolution is shifting from an “if” to a “where” and when”.

There are two different futures currently being imagined. First up, a heaven, of easy mobility as portrayed by autonomous vehicle (AV) manufacturers, with shared-use AV freeing up road space for public spaces and accidents reduced to near zero. Or alternatively, a hellish, dystopian pod-world, with single-occupancy pod-armadas leading to an irresistible demand for more roads, and with people cloistered away in walkways and tunnels; Bladerunner but with added trees.

Most likely, the reality will turn out to be somewhere in between, as cities and regions across the globe shape and accommodate innovation and experimentation.

But in the understandable rush for the benefits of automation we need to start with the end in mind. What type of places do we want to live in? How do we want to relate to each other? How do we want to be?

At Sustrans we want to see a society where the way we travel creates healthier places and happier lives for everyone – because without concerted effort we are going to end up with an unequal and inequitable distribution of the benefits and disbenefits from the mobility revolution. Fundamentally this is about space and power. The age-old question of who has access to space and how. And power tends to win.  

The wealthy will use AV’s and EV’s first – they already are – and the young and upwardly mobile will embrace micro mobility. But low-income, older and disabled residents could be left in the margins with old tech, no tech and no space.

We were founded in 1977, when off the back of the oil crises a group of engineers and radical thinkers pioneered the transformation of old railway lines into paths that everyone could walk and cycle on: old tech put to the service of even older tech. Back then the petrol-powered car was the future. Over 40 years on, the 16,575-mile National Cycle Network spans the length and breadth of the UK, crossing and connecting towns, cities and countryside, with over half of the population living within two miles of its routes.


Last year, more than 800 million trips were made on the Network. That’s almost half as many journeys made on the rail network, or 12 journeys for every person in the UK. These trips benefited the UK economy by £88m through reduced road congestion and contributed £2.5bn to local economies through leisure and tourism. Walking and cycling on the Network also prevented 630 early deaths and averted nearly 8,000 serious long-term health conditions.

These benefits would be much higher if the paths on the entire Network were separated from motor traffic; currently only one third of them are. Completing an entirely traffic-free walking and cycling network won’t be simple. So why do it?

In a world of micro-mobility, AVs and other disruptive technology, is the National Cycle Network still relevant?

Yes, absolutely. This is about more than just connecting places and enabling people to travel without a car. These paths connect people to one other. In times when almost a fifth of the UK population say they are always or often lonely, these paths are a vital asset. They provide free space for everyone to move around, to be, and spend time together. It’s the kind of space that keeps our country more human and humane.

No matter how clever the technological interface between autonomous vehicles and people, we will need dedicated space for the public to move under their own power, to walk and cycle, away from vehicles. As a civil society we will need to fight for this.

And for this reason, the creation of vehicle-free space – a network of walking and cycling paths for everyone is as important, and as radical, as it was 40-years ago.

Xavier Brice is CEO of the walking and cycling charity Sustrans. He spoke at the MOVE 2019 conference last week.