Just a big map of the cost of a return ticket from London to almost everywhere else in the country

Some ticket machines. Image: Getty.

As a Londoner, and cheapskate, who occasionally has the spur of the moment impulse to get on a train, it recently occurred to me that there might be a more methodical way of finding affordable day trips than throwing random place names into National Rail Enquiries until a return ticket that won’t empty my entire bank account appears.

Having previously tinkered about with the timetabling data provided by the Rail Delivery Group, it occurred to me that I might be able to get the associated fares dataset to spit out a price list of all the day return tickets from London and use that as prompt to find exciting new cheap day trips. So I did, and then I put it on a map.

This map doesn’t include advance tickets. It uses the cheapest route I could find* between London Terminals and the destination on either an off-peak, super off-peak or anytime return, depending on which kinds of ticket are actually available on that route. And it comes with absolutely no guarantee by either myself or CityMetric that you can buy a ticket at this price – not least since if you’re reading this in 2025 it’ll long since be out of date.

With those provisos, here it is:

 

So, what can we learn from this?

1. The best value per mile destination from London is… Wrexham!

A bargain at only 25p per mile. That’s Wrexham General, not Wrexham Central, which despite being an 8 minute walk away is a shocking 52 pence per mile journey from the capital. Rip off Britain!

2. The furthest you can get from London for under a tenner is… Balcombe!

Why not go and visit the farmhouse that stood in for Arthur Dent’s house from the BBC TV version of the Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy? I bet they’re definitely not tired of people taking photos of each other lying down outside of it!

More directly CityMetric relevant: it’s near the Ouse Valley Viaduct, which is a pretty good viaduct.

3. Furthest you can get for under 20 quid is… Peterborough!

The ‘worst place in Britain not to have a car’ according to a 2014 survey. Why not spend a day not having a car in Peterborough to try this out?

And for only 30p more you can go to Sheerness! “I once rode my unicycle from South London to Sheerness on Sea, on the Isle of Sheppey. I’ve never been anywhere so bleak,” says someone on the forums of singletrackworld.com, instantly selling me on the idea of going to Sheerness.

4. Birmingham and the general vicinity are quite good value, it turns out

Look at all those places you can get to for only just over £30 return. Wait until my girlfriend finds out where our next holiday is going to be!


5. There seem to be tickets available that aren’t actually usable

I couldn’t actually find any trains running on the route listed for Water Orton and Coleshill Parkway, “LNR and XC only”. So if you do manage to buy one of those tickets, working that out is a puzzle for you and you alone.

6. You can save quite a lot of money by walking a mile

See the aforementioned Wrexham General/Wrexham Central ‘discrepancy’: cheapest ticket to Central: £40.50; General: £86.90.

Getting to London Road station, a mile from Brighton, costs £28.50, while you can get to Brighton for just £12.20!

This of course doesn’t factor in different journey lengths, required changes, etc. Maybe it turns out you actually value your time!

7. Brighton really is a bargain – it’s the cheapest bit of seaside you can get to from London!

It and Southend are the only bits of beach accessible for under £15. But if you’re feeling a bit more flush, £35 will get you to and from more or less anywhere on the coast between Southampton and Harwich.

8. You’ll need to drop at least £120 to get to Scotland.

For that you can get as far as Kirkconnel, halfway between Dumfries and Glasgow. Admittedly it wouldn’t be much of a day trip anyway, since after a 5 hour train journey there you’d have about an hour before the last train of the day back. Well, unless spending 2 hours at Carlisle station waiting for a 2am sleeper train is your idea of fun. Which if you’ve read this far is a possibility!

Apologies to anyone who isn’t from London and complains on Facebook about everything I write being about London until I block you. Maybe if you share this post loads on social media, I’ll make a map of the cost of train tickets from YOUR boring hometown.

*The system is extremely complex, so no doubt there are some quirks I’ve missed. Thanks to the kind people of railforums.co.uk who pointed me in something approaching the right direction when I got totally lost.

 
 
 
 

What’s killing northerners?

The Angel of the North. Image: Getty.

There is a stark disparity in wealth and health between people in the north and south of England, commonly referred to as England’s “north-south divide”. The causes of this inequality are complex; it’s influenced by the environment, jobs, migration and lifestyle factors – as well as the long-term political power imbalances, which have concentrated resources and investment in the south, especially in and around London.

Life expectancy is also lower in the north, mainly because the region is more deprived. But new analysis of national mortality data highlights a shockingly large mortality gap between young adults, aged 25 to 44, living in the north and south of England. This gap first emerged in the late 1990s, and seems to have been growing ever since.

In 1995, there were 2% more deaths among northerners aged 25 to 34 than southerners (in other words, 2% “excess mortality”). But by 2015, northerners in this age group were 29% more likely to die than their southern counterparts. Likewise, in the 35 to 44 age group, there was 3% difference in mortality between northerners and southerners in 1995. But by 2015, there were 49% more deaths among northerners than southerners in this age group.

Excess mortality in the north compared with south of England by age groups, from 1965 to 2015. Follow the lines to see that people born around 1980 are the ones most affected around 2015.

While mortality increased among northerners aged 25 to 34, and plateaued among 35 to 44-year-olds, southern mortality mainly declined across both age groups. Overall, between 2014 and 2016, northerners aged 25 to 44 were 41% more likely to die than southerners in the same age group. In real terms, this means that between 2014 and 2016, 1,881 more women and 3,530 more men aged between 25 and 44 years died in the north, than in the south.

What’s killing northerners?

To understand what’s driving this mortality gap among young adults, our team of researchers looked at the causes of death from 2014 to 2016, and sorted them into eight groups: accidents, alcohol related, cardiovascular related (heart conditions, diabetes, obesity and so on), suicide, drug related, breast cancer, other cancers and other causes.

Controlling for the age and sex of the population in the north and the south, we found that it was mostly the deaths of northern men contributing to the difference in mortality – and these deaths were caused mainly by cardiovascular conditions, alcohol and drug misuse. Accidents (for men) and cancer (for women) also played important roles.

From 2014 to 2016, northerners were 47% more likely to die for cardiovascular reasons, 109% for alcohol misuse and 60% for drug misuse, across both men and women aged 25 to 44 years old. Although the national rate of death from cardiovascular reasons has dropped since 1981, the longstanding gap between north and south remains.

Death and deprivation

The gap in life expectancy between north and south is usually put down to socioeconomic deprivation. We considered further data for 2016, to find out if this held true for deaths among young people. We found that, while two thirds of the gap were explained by the fact that people lived in deprived areas, the remaining one third could be caused by some unmeasured form of deprivation, or by differences in culture, infrastructure, migration or extreme weather.

Mortality for people aged 25 to 44 years in 2016, at small area geographical level for the whole of England.

Northern men faced a higher risk of dying young than northern women – partly because overall mortality rates are higher for men than for women, pretty much at every age, but also because men tend to be more susceptible to socioeconomic pressures. Although anachronistic, the expectation to have a job and be able to sustain a family weighs more on men. Accidents, alcohol misuse, drug misuse and suicide are all strongly associated with low socioeconomic status.

Suicide risk is twice as high among the most deprived men, compared to the most affluent. Suicide risk has also been associated with unemployment, and substantial increases in suicide have been observed during periods of recession – especially among men. Further evidence tells us that unskilled men between ages 25 and 39 are between ten and 20 times more likely to die from alcohol-related causes, compared to professionals.

Alcohol underpins the steep increase in liver cirrhosis deaths in Britain from the 1990s – which is when the north-south divide in mortality between people aged 25 to 44 also started to emerge. Previous research has shown that men in this age group, who live in the most deprived areas, are five times more likely to die from alcohol-related diseases than those in the most affluent areas. For women in deprived areas, the risk is four times greater.


It’s also widely known that mortality rates for cancer are higher in more deprived areas, and people have worse survival rates in places where smoking and alcohol abuse is more prevalent. Heroin and crack cocaine addiction and deaths from drug overdoses are also strongly associated with deprivation.

The greater number of deaths from accidents in the north should be considered in the context of transport infrastructure investment, which is heavily skewed towards the south – especially London, which enjoys the lowest mortality in the country. What’s more, if reliable and affordable public transport is not available, people will drive more and expose themselves to higher risk of an accident.

Deaths for young adults in the north of England have been increasing compared to those in the south since the late 1990s, creating new health divides between England’s regions. It seems that persistent social, economic and health inequalities are responsible for a growing trend of psychological distress, despair and risk taking among young northerners. Without major changes, the extreme concentration of power, wealth and opportunity in the south will continue to damage people’s health, and worsen the north-south divide.

The Conversation

Evangelos Kontopantelis, Professor in Data Science and Health Services Research, University of Manchester

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.