Here are the most annoying station names on the Singapore MRT network

Yishun station in Singapore. Image: Getty.

Editor’s note: On Twitter, after publishing yet another rant about London station names, I noted that I would be delighted to publish similar rants about other cities, if only anyone thought to send them to me. Here’s one now.

one-north

This station, named after a neighbouring business park, is the only station on the whole network to have a name which starts with an uncapitalised letter (and also the only one with a hyphen in its name).

Every time I see this station on the map, I get annoyed because I think that someone has made a typo. Then I remember that this is the station’s correct name and I sigh.

HarbourFront

This one’s located underneath HarbourFront Centre, which is on Harbourfront Place. Unfortunately, the station takes after the shopping centre rather than the street name, leaving yet another station with inappropriate capitalisation in its name.

Farrer Park and Farrer Road

These two stations sound they should be right next to each other: they sound so similar!

The MRT system map. Click to expand.

Unfortunately, they are about 6.6km apart, with Farrer Park being located in the fairly central district of Little India, and Farrer Road lying in the middle of an upmarket suburb. These two stations are not even on the same MRT line.

The similarity of the two names have gotten many people confused, and unfortunately for anyone who has made the mistake of going to the wrong one, it’s a 25 minute journey between the two.

Downtown

This station’s name implies that it is in the heart of Singapore’s central business district, which is slightly misleading. One of its exits literally opens out into an empty patch of grass, which is not something one usually finds in the heart of a city.

The actual “downtown” area can be found around Raffles Place, a neighbouring station about 8 minutes’ walk away.


Jurong East

There is no Jurong West station, unfortunately. The suburb of Jurong West is served by three MRT stations (Lakeside, Boon Lay and Pioneer) but it feels like a missed opportunity that none of them have been named in such a way to serve as a complement to their neighbouring station in the east.

This is especially evident when you look at the suburb of Tampines, whose three stations (Tampines, Tampines West and Tampines East) form a satisfying trio.

Beauty World

The name of this station is evocative, leading one to imagine vibrantly coloured wildflowers blooming in green meadows just lying in wait right outside.

Once you step out of the exit however, there is not much beauty in sight. This station is located in a distant suburban neighbourhood best known for its 24-hour restaurants, and is named for an amusement park which once stood in the vicinity but is no longer there, having been replaced by 70’s-era concrete block towers.

Cashew

It is a bit difficult to take a station seriously when it’s named after a nut.

In its defence, it’s actually named for Cashew Road, and is located in a neighbourhood where all the other streets are also named after nuts. They include Hazel Park Terrace, Chestnut Close and Almond Avenue.

Image: Open Street Map.

Stadium

This one is a little vague, as there are two stadiums located in the vicinity of the station (the National Stadium and Singapore Indoor Stadium), and it is not exactly clear which of these the station is named after. Furthermore, it seems to imply that there is only one stadium in the whole country, which is not the case. Perhaps a better name for this station would be National Stadium, which would solve both of these issues at one go.

Tuas Link

Many stations are named after nearby roads, which is a perfectly acceptable (if a little unoriginal) naming method. However, in this case, there isn’t an actual road called Tuas Link.

There is a Tuas Link 1, along with Tuas Link 2, 3 and 4. But no Tuas Link, which is frankly unacceptable and needs to be rectified immediately.

Image: Open Street Map.

Lavender

As with Beauty World, one almost expects to exit this station and be greeted by fields of aromatic purple flowers. No such luck. The only thing worth sniffing around for in this area is the Michelin-starred food stall selling delicious minced meat noodles in a soy-and-vinegar based sauce.

If you would like to complain about the names of stations in your city, you know where we are.

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Never mind Brexit: TfL just released new tube map showing an interchange at Camden Town!!!

Mmmmm tube-y goodness. Image: TfL.

Crossrail has just been given a £1bn bail out. This, according to the Financial TImes’s Jim Pickard, is on top of the £600m bailout in July and £300m loan in October.

That, even with the pound crashing as it is right now, is quite a lot of money. It’s bad, especially at a time when there is still seemingly not a penny available to make sure trains can actually run in the north.

But the world is quite depressing enough today, so let’s focus on something happier. On Saturday night – obviously peak time for cartographic news – Transport for London emailed me to let me know it would be updating the tube map, to show more street-level interchanges:

Connections between several pairs of stations that are near to each other, but have traditionally not been shown as interchanges, now appear on the map for the first time. These include:

  • Camden Road and Camden Town
  • Euston and Euston Square
  • Finchley Road and Finchley Road & Frognal
  • Kenton and Northwick Park
  • New Cross and New Cross Gate
  • Seven Sisters and South Tottenham
  • Swiss Cottage and South Hampstead

The stations shown meet a set of criteria that has been used to help determine which should be included. This criteria includes stations less than a 700m or a 10 minute walk apart, where there is an easy, well-lit, signposted walking route and where making the change opens up additional travel options.

The results are, well, this:

In addition, interchanges between stations have traditionally appeared on the Tube map as two solid lines, irrespective of whether they are internal or external (which means customers need to leave the station and then re-enter for the station or stop they need). This approach has now been updated and shows a clear distinction between the two types, with external interchanges now being depicted by a dashed line, linking the two stations or stops.

And lo, it came to pass:

I have slightly mixed feelings about this, in all honesty. On the positive side: I think generally showing useful street-level interchanges as A Good Thing. I’ve thought for years that Camden Road/Camden Town in particular was one worth highlighting, as it opens up a huge number of north-east travel options (Finchley to Hackney, say), and apps like CityMapper tell you to use it already.


And yet, now they’ve actually done it, I’m suddenly not sure. That interchange is pretty useful if you’re an able bodied person who doesn’t mind navigating crowds or crossing roads – but the map gives you no indication that it’s a harder interchange than, say, Wanstead Park to Forest Gate.

The new map also doesn’t tell you how far you’re going to be walking at street level. I can see the argument that a 400m walk shouldn’t disqualify something as an interchange – you can end up walking that far inside certain stations (Green Park, Bank/Monument), and the map shows them as interchanges. But the new version makes no effort to distinguish between 100m walks (West Hampstead) and 700m ones (Northwick Park-Kenton), which it probably should.

I’m also slightly baffled by some of the specific choices. Is Finchley Road-Finchley Road & Frognal really a useful interchange, when there’s an easier and more direct version, one stop up the line? No hang on West Hampstead isn’t on the Metropolitan line isn’t it? So that’s what it’s about.

Okay, a better one: if you’re switching from District to Central lines in the City, you’re generally better off alighting at Cannon Street, rather than Monument, for Bank – honestly, it’s a 90 second walk to the new entrance on Walbrook. Yet that one isn’t there. What gives?

The complete new tube map. The full version is on TfL’s website, here.

On balance, showing more possible interchanges on the map is a positive change. But it doesn’t negate the need for a fundamental rethink of how the tube map looks and what it is for. And it’s not, I fear, enough to distract from the Crossrail problem.

Jonn Elledge is the editor of CityMetric. He is on Twitter as @jonnelledge and on Facebook as JonnElledgeWrites.