“Birmingham isn’t a big city at peak times”: How poor public transport explains the UK’s productivity puzzle

A bus, in Birmingham. Image: Wikimedia Commons.

For a year now, the Open Data Institute Leeds has been tracking most of the buses and trams in the West Midlands, the UK city region centred on Birmingham. We do it by polling the live departure screens that you see at bus stops, even at stops where they aren’t installed.

So far we’ve recorded 40m bus departures, a total of 16GB of data. And we’ve written tools to explore it in seconds.

You can try for yourself here. You can see how long every bus took to connect any two bus stops anywhere in The West Midlands, and calculate averages over tens of thousands of bus journeys at specific times, to see how bus journey times change over the course of a typical day.

But why?

The agglomeration effect

We’ve mostly done this work because of the following graph.

Click to expand.

Many economists argue that larger cities are more productive than smaller cities, and become ever more productive as they grow due to something called “agglomeration benefits”.

There are many other factors that contribute to productivity, but this simple law seems to hold well in economies like the USA, Germany, France, and the Netherlands. For example, Lyon, the second largest city in France, is more productive than Marseille, the third largest city, which is in turn more productive than Lille.

Almost uniquely among large developed countries, this pattern does not hold in the UK. The UK’s large cities see no significant benefit to productivity from size, especially when we exclude the capital.

The result is that our biggest non-capital cities, Manchester and Birmingham, are significantly less productive than almost all similar-sized cities in Europe, and less productive than much smaller cities such as Edinburgh, Oxford, and Bristol.

Public transport and city size

One notable difference between the UK’s large cities and those in similar countries is how little public transport infrastructure they have.

While France’s second, third, and fourth cities have eight Metro lines between them (four in Lyon, two each in Marseille and Lille), the UK’s equivalents have none.

Manchester and Lyon have similar-sized tramway systems, with about 100 stations each; but Marseille (3 lines) and Lille (2 lines) have substantially more than Birmingham (1 line) and Leeds (0 lines).

Is it possible that poor public transport in the UK’s large cities makes their effective size smaller, and thus sacrifices the agglomeration benefits we would expect from their population?

Our Real Journey Time data lets us ask this question.

Real journey time, and journey time variability

There is an important difference between bus public transport and fixed infrastructure public transport: reliability. I have used our Real Journey Time tool to calculate the worst-case (95th percentile) journey time on public transport on two routes into Birmingham. This is the time that a public transport user must leave for their journey to ensure that they are only late for work or a meeting once a month.

The first journey is a bus from the south of the city, Stirchley to, Birmingham. This 3.5 mile journey takes about 20 minutes between 6am and 7am, and about 40 minutes between 8am and 9am.

The second journey is a tram from West Bromwich to Birmingham. This 8.5 mile journey takes 30 minutes regardless of when it is taken, as the tram route is almost completely segregated from traffic.

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While the tram is substantially quicker at all times than the bus, the reliability of its timing, even during the most congested periods, provides an additional large benefit to users.

We think that people generate the most agglomeration benefits for a city when they travel at peak times, to get to and from work, meetings, and social events. Our tool shows us that, at the times when people need to travel in order to generate these benefits, buses are extremely slow. And since buses are by far the largest mode of public transport in Birmingham, this is likely to have significantly higher impact there than in Lyon; in the latter, the largest mode of public transport is the metro, which delivers reliable journey times no matter the time of day.

Our hypothesis is that Birmingham’s reliance on buses makes its effective population much smaller than its real population. This reduces its productivity by sacrificing agglomeration benefits. For the past six months, using our Real Journey Time tool, we’ve worked with The Productivity Insights Network to quantify that.


At peak times, Birmingham is a small city

The technique is quite simple. We pick 30 minutes as the travel time by bus that marks the boundary of the Birmingham agglomeration. This doesn’t include walking at either end of a journey, or waiting time, so this figure may well mean a 50 minute total journey.

We then use our real journey time to examine how far from central Birmingham that allowed journey time would let a person live.

For example, by examining six months of journeys on the buses, we calculate that, at off-peak times a person five miles from Birmingham in West Bromwich is part of the Birmingham agglomeration. At peak times, this is no longer the case and the outer boundary of the Birmingham agglomeration is reduced in size to just 3.5 miles away in Smethwick.

Making use of our data on trams, we can also imagine a Birmingham where major bus routes are replaced by trams and enjoy fast and reliable journey durations, even at peak times. The agglomeration then includes people as far away as Bilston, 9 miles away.

By repeating this process for bus route into Birmingham from every direction, we create a boundary of the effective size of Birmingham at different times of the day. By summing the population living within each boundary, we calculate the real size of Birmingham under three conditions: by bus at peak time, by bus at off-peak time, and in an imaginary future where all buses travelled as quickly and reliably as trams (simulated tram).

At this point you might see why we picked 30 minutes as our travel time. Allowing 30 minutes of travel time using fixed infrastructure such as a tram gives Birmingham a population of about 1.7 million people, which is very close to its population as defined by the OECD of about 1.9 million.

But at peak time Birmingham’s effective population is just 0.9m – less than half the population that the OECD use.

Birmingham’s effective size might explain most of its productivity gap

This is where things get very interesting. If we consider that Birmingham has a population of 1.9m, and we assume that agglomeration benefits should work in the UK to the same extent that they work in France, Birmingham has a 33 per cent productivity shortfall. This underperformance of the UK’s large cities is part of the productivity puzzle that UK economists have been desperately trying to solve.

But once you understand that Birmingham’s real size is much smaller, below 1m people, the productivity shortfall reduces to just 9 per cent and is no longer significant.

Click to expand.

Our hypothesis is that, by relying on buses that get caught in congestion at peak times for public transport, Birmingham sacrifices significant size and thus agglomeration benefits to cities like Lyon, which rely on trams and metros. This is based on our calculations that a whole-city tramway system for Birmingham would deliver an effective size roughly equal to the OECD-defined population.

This difference seems to explain a significant proportion of the productivity gap between UK large cities and their European equivalents.

So what should we do?

The good news is that Birmingham’s current plans for transport investment are aimed at increasing its effective size at peak times.

  • Using our Real Journey Time tool, TfWM are targeting investment in bus lanes and bus priority measures to improve journey speed and journey reliability on existing bus routes.
  • Seven sprint bus routes are being planned, with bus priority measures hopefully delivering journey time reliability similar to a tram.
  • Two tram extensions (to Wolverhampton Train station and Edgbaston) are under construction, with two more (to Dudley and Birmingham Airport) under study.
  • Station re-openings at places like Moseley and Kings Heath will offer reliable journeys by rail to new areas of the city.

The prize for achieving this is large. If bus journey times became as reliable at peak time as they are off peak, the effective population of Birmingham would increase from 0.9m to 1.3m. If we assume that agglomeration benefits in the UK are as significant as in France, this would lead to an increase in GDP/capita of 7 per cent.

Tom Forth is head of data at the Open Data Institute Leeds. This work was undertaken with Daniel Billingsley and Neil McClure.

 

 
 
 
 

Green roofs improve cities – so why don’t all buildings have them?

The green roof at the Kennedy Centre, Washington DC. Image: Getty.

Rooftops covered with grass, vegetable gardens and lush foliage are now a common sight in many cities around the world. More and more private companies and city authorities are investing in green roofs, drawn to their wide-ranging benefits which include savings on energy costs, mitigating the risk from floods, creating habitats for urban wildlife, tackling air pollution and urban heat and even producing food.

A recent report in the UK suggested that the green roof market there is expanding at a rate of 17 per cent each year. The world’s largest rooftop farm will open in Paris in 2020, superseding similar schemes in New York City and Chicago. Stuttgart, in Germany, is thought of as “the green roof capital of Europe”, while Singapore is even installing green roofs on buses.

These increasingly radical urban designs can help cities adapt to the monumental challenges they face, such as access to resources and a lack of green space due to development. But buy-in from city authorities, businesses and other institutions is crucial to ensuring their success – as is research investigating different options to suit the variety of rooftop spaces found in cities.

A growing trend

The UK is relatively new to developing green roofs, and governments and institutions are playing a major role in spreading the practice. London is home to much of the UK’s green roof market, mainly due to forward-thinking policies such as the 2008 London Plan, which paved the way to more than double the area of green roofs in the capital.

Although London has led the way, there are now “living labs” at the Universities of Sheffield and Salford which are helping to establish the precedent elsewhere. The IGNITION project – led by the Greater Manchester Combined Authority – involves the development of a living lab at the University of Salford, with the aim of uncovering ways to convince developers and investors to adopt green roofs.

Ongoing research is showcasing how green roofs can integrate with living walls and sustainable drainage systems on the ground, such as street trees, to better manage water and make the built environment more sustainable.

Research is also demonstrating the social value of green roofs. Doctors are increasingly prescribing time spent gardening outdoors for patients dealiong with anxiety and depression. And research has found that access to even the most basic green spaces can provide a better quality of life for dementia sufferers and help prevent obesity.

An edible roof at Fenway Park, stadium of the Boston Red Sox. Image: Michael Hardman/author provided.

In North America, green roofs have become mainstream, with a wide array of expansive, accessible and food-producing roofs installed in buildings. Again, city leaders and authorities have helped push the movement forward – only recently, San Francisco created a policy requiring new buildings to have green roofs. Toronto has policies dating from the 1990s, encouraging the development of urban farms on rooftops.

These countries also benefit from having newer buildings, which make it easier to install green roofs. Being able to store and distribute water right across the rooftop is crucial to maintaining the plants on any green roof – especially on “edible roofs” which farm fruit and vegetables. And it’s much easier to create this capacity in newer buildings, which can typically hold greater weight, than retro-fit old ones. Having a stronger roof also makes it easier to grow a greater variety of plants, since the soil can be deeper.


The new normal?

For green roofs to become the norm for new developments, there needs to be buy-in from public authorities and private actors. Those responsible for maintaining buildings may have to acquire new skills, such as landscaping, and in some cases volunteers may be needed to help out. Other considerations include installing drainage paths, meeting health and safety requirements and perhaps allowing access for the public, as well as planning restrictions and disruption from regular ativities in and around the buildings during installation.

To convince investors and developers that installing green roofs is worthwhile, economic arguments are still the most important. The term “natural capital” has been developed to explain the economic value of nature; for example, measuring the money saved by installing natural solutions to protect against flood damage, adapt to climate change or help people lead healthier and happier lives.

As the expertise about green roofs grows, official standards have been developed to ensure that they are designed, built and maintained properly, and function well. Improvements in the science and technology underpinning green roof development have also led to new variations on the concept.

For example, “blue roofs” increase the capacity of buildings to hold water over longer periods of time, rather than drain away quickly – crucial in times of heavier rainfall. There are also combinations of green roofs with solar panels, and “brown roofs” which are wilder in nature and maximise biodiversity.

If the trend continues, it could create new jobs and a more vibrant and sustainable local food economy – alongside many other benefits. There are still barriers to overcome, but the evidence so far indicates that green roofs have the potential to transform cities and help them function sustainably long into the future. The success stories need to be studied and replicated elsewhere, to make green, blue, brown and food-producing roofs the norm in cities around the world.

Michael Hardman, Senior Lecturer in Urban Geography, University of Salford and Nick Davies, Research Fellow, University of Salford.

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.