Where are largest cities in the world? 2015 edition

The world's biggest cities from above. Image: Getty.

The number of people who live in a city, as we may have mentioned before, is surprisingly hard to work out. That's partly because populations shift and change, unnoticed by demographers.


Mostly, though, it's because you quickly run into the fact that different authorities define their cities in entirely incompatible ways, rendering any attempt to compare them a bit like comparing apples with trucks. What you really need is a single source that follows a single set of rules: the results may not be perfect, but at least they'll be consistent.

That’s where Demographia comes in. The St. Louis-based consultancy was founded by the urban planner Wendell Cox (who, unusually for someone in that line of work, likes to write articles for conservative publications about the benefits of private car ownership). It also has a website that is, with the best will in the world, not massively easy on the eye.

But every year Demographia publishes something rather good: the World Urban Areas Report, a sort of bumper book of city population stats. You can check out the 11th edition here.

Here’s how it defines a city:

An urban area ("built-up urban area," urbanized area or urban agglomeration) is a continuously built up land mass of urban development that is within a labor market (metropolitan area or metropolitan region). An urban area contains no rural land... [It] is best thought of as the “urban footprint” – the lighted area that can be observed from an airplane (or satellite) on a clear night.

This year's edition of the World Urban Areas Report covers more than a thousand of the largest cities in the world, from Tokyo (pop. 37,000,000), right down to tiddlers like 850th-ranked Leicester (Pop. 534,000): all 1,009 cities, in fact, with a population of half a million of more.

Here are the top 10. See if you can spot any pattern.

 

Seeing it yet? Need a clue?

Okay, here's the same chart again. This time, we’ve coloured the cities by continent.

 

Yep.

Asia's dominance continues as you move down the league tables, too. Here's the top 20:

 

The world's largest continent, in fact, is home to 33 of the world's 50 largest cities, and 50 of the top 100. After that we got bored and stopped counting.

This isn't quite as extreme a result as it may appear: Asia, after all, is home to just shy of 60 per cent of the world's population. So the way in which the 2.1bn people who live in cities of half a million souls or more are distributed around the globe is largely a function of where people actually live. Look:

Comparing those two graphs, you can see that the Americas and Australia are unusually urbanised, Africa unusually under-urbanised, and Europe and Asia are pretty close to what you'd expect.

There are two other striking things about these league tables.

China rules

The first is the dominance of China, which takes 12 places in the top 50, and 22 of the top 100.

Again, this shouldn't be surprising – it's the world's most populous country, home to nearly a fifth of humanity – but nonetheless, it's striking how many of these megacities you almost certainly haven't heard of.

Where power lies

The other striking thing here is how far down the league tables many of the world's most powerful cities fall. Here's where some of the places that commonly make the “world city” league tables fall:

 

Size, it seems, isn't everything.

The data

Here, for completism's sake, is a chart showing the figures for all the city population charts above. You can find the full data set on Demographia's website, here.

Rank City Population
1 Tokyo-Yokohama 37,843,000
2 Jakarta 30,539,000
3 Delhi 24,998,000
4 Maniilla 24,123,000
5 Seoul-Incheon 23,480,000
6 Shanghai 23,416,000
7 Karachi 22,123,000
8 Beijing 21,009,000
9 New York 20,630,000
10 Guangzhou-Foshan 20,597,000
11 Sao Paulo 20,365,000
12 Mexico City 20,063,000
13 Mumbai 17,712,000
14 Osaka-Kobe-Kyoto 17,444,000
15 Moscow 16,170,000
16 Dhaka 15,669,000
17 Cairo 15,600,000
18 Los Angeles 15,058,000
19 Bangkok 14,998,000
20 Kolkata 14,667,000
25 Shenzhen 12,084,000
28 Tianjin 10,920,000
29 Paris 10,858,000
31 Chengdu 10,376,000
32 London 10,236,000
37 Chicago 9,156,000
41 Dongguan 8,442,000
43 Wuhan 7,509,000
45 Hangzhou 7,275,000
46 Hong Kong 7,246,000
47 Chongqing 7,217,000
50 Quanzhou 6,710,000
57 Nanjing 6,155,000
58 Shenyang 6,078,000
59 Xi'an 5,977,000
62 Qingdao 5,816,000
68 Singapore 5,624,000
72 Suzhou 5,246,000
76 Zhengzhou 4,942,000
77 Washington DC 4,889,000
79 Harbin 4,815,000
89 Boston 4,478,000
90 Xiamen 4,420,000
94 Dalian 4,183,000
97 Berlin 4,069,000
99 Fuzhou 3,962,000
101 Dubai 3,933,000
299 Amsterdam 1,624,000
832 Geneva 599,000
 
 
 
 

Five ways in which the rest of the world can avoid the homelessness crisis plaguing the US

Housing for all. Image: Nicobobinus/Flickr/creative commons.

Homelessness is a growing problem in the UK, where the number of people sleeping rough has doubled since 2010, yet it is dwarfed by the scale of the issue in the US. More than 500,000 homeless were found across the US during just one night, compared to the UK’s 2017 count of 4,751. Changes in the definition of homelessness and flawed methodologies suggest that the true number for the US could be anywhere from 2.5 to 10.2 times greater.

Millions more live in overcrowded or slum housing, forced to choose between the damage that poor conditions do to their physical and mental health, and the street. All of the US’s housing issues – from foreclosures to evictions to poor conditions – hit communities of colour the hardest.

This is due to a legacy of discrimination, which continues to undercut any commitment to safe and decent housing for all residents, whether in the private or public sector. In my recent book, City of Segregation, I explain how the long, violent history of creating spaces for the white and privileged classes is embedded in a number of practices, which continue in US cities to this day.

Exporting inequality

As private developers and investors seek out urban land in major cities around the world to secure their fortunes, real estate patterns and practices developed within the US are increasingly being observed elsewhere.

In cities as diverse as London, Sydney and Durban, community groups which have been working for decades to improve their neighbourhoods languish with little public or private resource. Meanwhile, developers create spaces for foreign investors and new residents, who anticipate certain protections and privileges such as greater security, high quality amenities and neighbours with similar interests and backgrounds.

This is a driving force behind rising evictions and the criminalisation of homelessness, alongside gated communities, hostile architecture, “broken windows” policing with its focus on prosecuting activities such as graffiti or jaywalking and the growing privatisation of public spaces through regeneration.

But there is still time for other countries to choose a different path. The UK, in particular, can build on the legacies of the post-war political consensus that all residents should have access to quality housing, and its acknowledgement of institutional racism and some history of government anti-racist campaigning.

Both legacies should be improved, but a renewed commitment to a programme of housing and anti-racism are central to increasing equality, prosperity and well-being for all. Based on my research, I’ve come up with five steps which the UK and countries like it can follow, to ensure that future development reduces – rather than drives – homelessness and inequality.


1. Build social housing

Unlike the US, the UK acknowledges a right to a home, and within living memory provided it for a huge swathe of British society. Social housing – whether in the form of traditional council flats, cooperatives or community land trusts – provides a variety of housing types and keeps rents from rising too far beyond wages.

When social housing is widely available, it makes a huge difference to people who – for one reason or another, and often through no fault of their own – become homeless. With social housing to fall back on, homelessness is a temporary condition which can be safely resolved. Without it, homelessness can become a life-destroying downwards spiral.

2. Preserve and expand community assets

Severe segregation in the US stripped entire communities of access to quality food, jobs, education, green spaces, services, banks and loans. Poverty is endemic, and can easily tip into homelessness. While far from perfect, the UK’s post-war commitment to universal provision of services, such as education and health care, and building social housing across all neighbourhoods underpinned a surge in upward mobility.

This achievement should be salvaged from the damage done by Right To Buy – a policy which sold off social housing without replacing it – and austerity, which has prompted a sell-off of public assets and land, as well as the closure of childrens’ services, libraries and community centres.

3. Decommodify housing

A market geared towards building apartment blocks for the portfolios of investors who will never live in them cannot produce the kind of housing and neighbourhoods which residents need, much less at a price they can afford.

While London has been badly affected for some time, this trend is now spreading to other areas of the UK and Europe. Local and national governments must act to prevent global demand for housing as investments from driving prices beyond the reach of those who need real homes.

4. Build communities, not walls

Gates, bars, armed security and homeowner restrictions are all ugly traits of private housing developed within the US context of desperate inequality and racism. The UK has a long and vibrant tradition of community development, creating a supportive built environment and social infrastructure of schools, libraries and other municipal services for residents.

Community assets. Image: Helen K/Flickr/creative commons.

This kind of development, and the social mobility and growing equality it fosters, safeguards public health and safety – not big walls, barbed wire and security guards. The private rented sector in the UK should be regulated to bring it more in line with Europe, where tenants prosper with security of tenure and strong regulation of rents and rent increases.

5. Raise your voice

Those who are bearing the brunt of our current housing crisis must be at the centre of efforts to change it. From tenants’ associations and renters’ unions, to campaign groups such as Justice for Grenfell, it’s vital to support those voices advocating fairer housing rights.

This also means rejecting austerity’s constant cuts to public services, funding social support for physical and mental health and ensuring that homes are safe, decent and secure, to create a safety net for those who are working to improve their communities.

The Conversation

Andrea Gibbons, Researcher in Sustainable Housing and Urban Studies, University of Salford.

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.