Podcast: Transports of delight

A detail from Jug Cerovic's bus map of Luxembourg. Image: city of Luxembourg.

This week, we're talking about how, in a very real, no-honest-this-is-true sense, a city is the product of its transport network.

We begin by discussing the relationship between boundaries, commuting patterns, perceptions and maps – and I get slightly over-excited when Barbara tells me something about London’s Tube that I didn’t previously know.


Journalist Emmanuel Akinwotu tells us what it's like trying to get around Lagos, the Nigerian megacity where commuters rely on unofficial private minibus networks, and where heavy traffic and poor roads mean that a two hour journey can take you all night. You can find Emmanuel’s past articles for us here.

Then I talk to transport researcher Nicole Badstuber, about megaprojects: those multi-billion dollar transport schemes, which are meant to sort everything out, and which, almost always, go horribly, horribly wrong. Nicole’s stuff is here. (This one, on what other cities have to learn from Transport for London, is particularly good.)

Next, Tim Oliver, a listener and university lecturer in Leeds, tells us why he loves his city – even if the British government doesn't seem to.

If you'd like to appear on the show telling us about your city, we’d love to hear from you – so get in touch.

And finally, for this week's map of the week, we talk about Jug Cerovic's bus map of Luxembourg: an unofficial map that the city government decided was better than the real thing, and promptly adopted as official. Which just goes to show that all that time you spent making maps in your bedroom wasn’t wasted after all.

The episode itself is below. Also, you can (and, obviously, should) subscribe on AcastiTunes, or RSS.

 
 
 
 

Epidemiologist update: Covid-19 death toll passes 350,000 worldwide

An update from GlobalData Senior Epidemiologist Nanthida Nanthavong:

Globally, the total confirmed cases of Covid-19 have surpassed 5,609,000 with over 350,000 deaths and 2,287,000 recoveries.

The US continues to have the highest number of cases, followed by Brazil then Russia. Incidence rates in Brazil are also second to the US, but may surpass the US if the current incidence trend continues in Brazil. Russia has reported a steady number of new daily cases for the past week. The Moscow region accounts for the majority of cases in Russia.

Daily incidence rates in India have continued to increase as the country reported four of its highest daily incidence totals over the last few days.

South Africa has the highest daily incidence and highest number of cumulative cases in Africa. South Africa has also reported its two highest daily incidence totals over the last few days.