6 questions we still have about London's Garden Bridge

The Garden Bridge: monster or marvel?

London’s proposed Garden Bridge is a bit like the Rorschach inkblot test. To some, it looks like a new piece of public space and infrastructure in central London, littered with delightful greenery. To others, it looks a bit like a suspect waste of money probably motivated by, basically, pure evil.

These different perspectives are possible largely because of the substantial number of unanswered questions still surrounding the plans for the bridge, construction of which is due to begin at the end of 2015. Here are six – plus any answers we’ve been able to unearth so far.  

1. Just how much public money will be spent on it?

Until recently, everyone has been under the impression that the £175m cost of the bridge's construction will split into £60 worth of public investment and £115m of private money. Earlier this month, mayor Boris Johnson assured LBC listeners  that “the maintenance cost will not be borne by the public sector, I’ve made that clear.”

But last week, Architects’ Journal got hold of a letter in which the Greater London Authority appears to agree to underwrite the bridge’s £3.5m maintenance cost. 

We asked the Garden Bridge Trust (GBT) about this, and a spokesperson told us that the GLA had only underwritten the costs because the GBT could promise a “robust business plan” which should cover all maintenance: 

The Garden Bridge Trust fully intends and expects to raise the money required for both the construction of the Garden Bridge and the ongoing maintenance and operations. More than £120m has been pledged so far and we have a clear business plan in place to raise the estimated £3.5m per annum needed to cover the on-going costs.

Answer: Probably only that initial £60m. Probably.

2. Will you have to pay to cross it?

Rumours about the bridge's funding and its closure for private events led some to think passerby would have to pay to cross the bridge. This, however, isn't the case: private events would presumably be ticketed, but anyone crossing during normal hours could do so for free. 

Answer: No. 

3. Does it even count as a bridge?

Back in November, reports emerged that the bridge would not be open to cyclists, would close at night and for private events, and would only be open to groups of eight or more if they let staff know in advance. Also, that picnics (read: joy) would be banned. 

These regulations would hugely negate the usefulness of the bridge as a pedestrian walkway – you wouldn't be able to rely on crossing it whenever you needed to, so it'd be unlikely to form part of anyone's regular journeys. The rules on large groups and eating sandwiches would also make it less of a park or public space. 

On this, the GBT spokesperson said that the regulations on use are still under discussion. On the groups of eight issue, they said: 

Most public spaces have ways of managing large groups to ensure the safety and comfort of visitors. The Trust had to include this in the planning application and put forward an initial figure of more than 8 people... this was a starting point only and we are talking to stakeholders and the local planning authority to confirm our agreed numbers. 

And on the picnics?

The bridge is a place for people to linger and admire new views of the city, but it will also provide an efficient route for commuters... We will ask users to be considerate to others when using the bridge.

So, not massively clear then.

Answer: Yes, if enough of the limitations on its use are taken away. 

4. Is it in the right place?

Even if you do consider a walkway that's shut half the time and closed to cyclists a "bridge", it hasn't been planned for an area that particularly needs one. The proposed site is between Blackfriars Bridge and Waterloo Bridge, to link Temple with the Southbank:

This location only strengthens the impression that this is more tourist attraction than infrastructure project, however. There are already three bridges within 1km of the proposed crossing.

To the east, meanwhile, there's a long stretch of the river which is effectively uncrossable, where a bridge – even a limited one – would have genuinely come in handy. 

Answer: For maximum footfall from West End audiences and Southbank visitors, yes. For actual Londoners, no. 

5. Was Thomas Heatherwick the right designer for the job?

In another exclusive, Architects’ Journal revealed a couple of weeks ago that the bridge's chosen designer, Thomas Heatherwick, was scored more highly for bridge experience by TfL than the other two firms, despite the fact that both have designed far more bridges than him. 

Wilkinson Eyre, one of the firms turned down for the contract, lists 27 bridge projects on its website. Heatherwick, meanwhile, has reportedly only designed one. 

6. Is it a secret Diana memorial?

When Joanna Lumley first dreamt up the idea of a garden bridge back in 1997, she envisioned it as a memorial for the recently deceased Lady Di. We thought it was worth checking whether this was still the case.

According to the GBT spokesman, at least, the project is no longer linked to the people's princess in any way.

Answer: No, thank goodness. She's stuck with that fountain in Hyde Park and Kensington's Diana Memorial Playground. Sorry, Express readers.

 
 
 
 

“You don’t look like a train buff”: on sexism in the trainspotting community

A female guard on London’s former Metropolitan Railway. Image: Getty.

I am a railway enthusiast. I like looking at trains, I like travelling by train and I like the quirks of the vast number of different train units, transit maps and train operating companies.

I get goosebumps standing on a platform watching my train approach, eyeballing the names of the destinations on the dot matrix display over and over again, straining to hear the tinny departure announcements on the tannoy.  I’m fortunate enough to work on the site of a former railway station that not only houses beautiful old goods sheds, but still has an active railway line running alongside it. You can imagine my colleagues’ elation as I exclaim: “Wow! Look at that one!” for the sixth time that day, as another brilliantly gaudy freight train trundles past.

I am also a woman in my twenties. A few weeks my request to join a railway-related Facebook group was declined because I – and I quote here – “don’t look like a train buff”.

After posting about this exchange on Twitter, my outrage was widely shared. “They should be thrilled to have you!” said one. “What does a train buff look like?!” many others asked.

The answer, of course, is a middle-aged white man with an anorak and notebook. Supposedly, anyway. That’s the ancient stereotype of a “trainspotter”, which sadly shows no sign of waning.

I’m not alone in feeling marginalised in the railway community. Sarah, a railway enthusiast from Bournemouth, says she is used to funny looks when she tells people that she is not only into trains, but an engineer.

She speaks of her annoyance at seeing a poster bearing the phrase: “Beware Rail Enthusiasts Disease: Highly Infectious To Males Of All Ages”. “That did bug me,” she says, “because women can enjoy trains just as much as men.”


Vicki Pipe is best known as being one half of the YouTube sensation All The Stations, which saw her and her partner Geoff Marshall spend 2017 visiting every railway station in Great Britain.

“During our 2017 adventure I was often asked ‘How did your boyfriend persuade you to come along?’” she says. “I think some found it unusual that a woman might be independently interested or excited enough about the railways to spend sixteen weeks travelling to every station on the network.”

Pipe, who earlier this year travelled to all the stations in Ireland and Northern Ireland, is passionate about changing the way in which people think of the railways, including the perception of women in the industry.

“For me it’s the people that make the railways such an exciting place to explore – and many of these are women,” she explains. “Women have historically and continue to play an important part in the railway industry – throughout our journey we met female train drivers, conductors, station staff, signallers and engineers. I feel it is important that more female voices are heard so that women of the future recognise the railways as a place they too can be part of.”

Despite the progress being made, it’s clear there is still a long way to go in challenging stereotypes and proving that girls can like trains, too.

I’m appalled that in 2019 our life choices are still subjected to critique. This is why I want to encourage women to embrace their interests and aspirations – however “nerdy”, or unusual, or untraditionally “female” they may be – and to speak up for things that I was worried to speak about for so long.

We might not change the world by doing so but, one by one, we’ll let others know that we’ll do what we want – because we can.