This is why pedestrians and cyclists disappear when it starts getting dark

Where did everybody go? Darkened London streets, 1929 vintage. Image: Getty.

Picture the scene: it is 5:30pm on a Tuesday at the end of October, and the streets are full of people walking and cycling home from work. The following week, at the same time, the number of walkers and cyclists has dropped by almost half. The only difference is the clocks have moved back one hour to mark the beginning of Daylight Saving Time.

Naturally, the number of people walking or cycling varies greatly at different times during the day. But twice every year, when the clocks change, researchers like myself get a rare opportunity to compare numbers of pedestrians and cyclists in the same hour of the day, but under different lighting conditions. This enables us to measure the impact that darkness has on how people choose to get around, while other influential factors such as the reason for travelling or the temperature remain largely unchanged.

Using open-source data from automated pedestrian and cyclist counters in a United States district, my colleagues and I analysed the number of pedestrians and cyclists in the same hour of the day, over a two-week period, both before and after the clocks changed.

Darkness effectively reduced the volume of pedestrians by 38 per cent and the volume of cyclists by 27 per cent, after taking into account any changes unrelated to light conditions.

Night and day

There are a number of reasons why people might prefer not to walk or cycle after dark. It’s more difficult to see the path when it’s dark and harder to spot potential trip hazards. Pedestrians have to spend more time looking down and are also less likely to be able to detect obstacles.

Darkness also makes it more difficult for walkers and cyclists to be seen by other road users. As a result, pedestrians are 1.7 times more likely to be hit by a vehicle while using a pedestrian crossing at night, compared with during the day.

Example pedestrian crossing in daylight (left) and after-dark (right). Image: author provided.

Another reason people may not choose to walk or cycle when it is dark is because they feel less safe. One theory suggests that people assess the safety of an environment based on three things: the ability to see clearly for a distance, the presence of features which could conceal a threat and the potential to escape from the area. Therefore, most places are likely to feel less safe at night, because we cannot see as well in the dark.

Fighting the darkness

Ideally, people should be encouraged to walk or cycle, even when it turns dark, because of the huge potential health and environmental benefits. Of course, networks of public street lights have been combating darkness in cities since the 19th century, following the discovery of coal-gas as an illuminant by Scottish engineer William Murdoch. Smoking his pipe beside a fire one night, Murdoch decided to put coal dust in the pipe and put it in the fire. The bright flame that emerged from the mouthpiece prompted the revelation of using gas as a light source.

William Murdoch, pioneer of street gas-lighting. Image: Wikimedia Commons.

But it’s increasingly important to use street lighting effectively to avoid wasting energy and creating needless light pollution, which can have negative effects on plants and animals. To that end, lots of research has been carried out to pinpoint the perfect level of lighting, which still enables pedestrians and cyclists to see effectively without wasting any energy.

Current guidelines for street lighting recommend average light levels of two to 15 lux, depending on the type of street. The evidence supporting these guidelines may be flawed however. The 2.5 GWh of energy used by street lighting every year may therefore be misplaced.

Laboratory research has been conducted to measure the impact of light spectrum and intensity on a pedestrian’s ability to detect a trip hazard. The study found that people are able to perceive a hazard with just two lux of illuminance. When the light was brighter than this, people did not get any better at detecting hazards.

The research also found that white light can be used at lower intensities, without affecting pedestrians’ visual performance. Similar results were found for cyclists’ ability to detect hazards.

Experimental apparatus to assess effect of lighting on cyclists’ detection of a hazard in the road (Fotios, Qasem, Cheal & Uttley, 2017).

Building on work carried out in the US at the end of the 1990s, our team at Sheffield University is also trying to identify lighting conditions which help people feel safe on the streets at night. The US research, carried out in parking lots, found that people felt safer when lights were brighter but that the benefits did not increase correspondingly as brightness increased. We are now verifying these findings on residential streets.

The change of the clocks every autumn – and the earlier onset of darkness – serves as a reminder of how significant daylight is to people’s everyday behaviour, particularly the way they choose to travel. Lighting can help us continue our day-to-day lives even when the sun goes down – and in this new age of highly controllable and efficient LED lighting it is tempting to assume “the more light the better”.


The ConversationIdentifying lighting conditions that meet our requirements without being excessive can help us save energy, reduce carbon emissions, reduce the ecological impact of our lighting and even make astronomers happier.

Jim Uttley is a postdoctoral researcher in lighting & environmental psychology at the University of Sheffield.

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

 
 
 
 

Everything you ever wanted to know about the Seoul Metro System but were too afraid to ask

Gwanghwamoon subway station on line 5 in Seoul, 2010. Image: Getty.

Seoul’s metro system carries 7m passengers a day across 1,000 miles of track. The system is as much a regional commuter railway as an urban subway system. Without technically leaving the network, one can travel from Asan over 50 miles to the south of central Seoul, all the way up to the North Korean border 20 miles north of the city.

Fares are incredibly low for a developed country. A basic fare of 1,250 won (about £1) will allow you to travel 10km; it’s only an extra 100 won (about 7p) to travel every additional 5km on most lines.

The trains are reasonably quick: maximum speeds of 62mph and average operating speeds of around 20mph make them comparable to London Underground. But the trains are much more spacious, air conditioned and have wi-fi access. Every station also has protective fences, between platform and track, to prevent suicides and accidents.

The network

The  service has a complex system of ownership and operation. The Seoul Metro Company (owned by Seoul City council) operates lines 5-8 on its own, but lines 1-4 are operated jointly with Korail, the state-owned national rail company. Meanwhile, Line 9 is operated jointly between Trans-Dev (a French company which operates many buses in northern England) and RATP (The Parisian version of TfL).

Then there’s Neotrans, owned by the Korean conglomerate Doosan, which owns and operates the driverless Sinbundang line. The Incheon city government, which borders Seoul to the west, owns and operates Incheon Line 1 and Line 2.

The Airport Express was originally built and owned by a corporation jointly owned by 11 large Korean firms, but is now mostly owned by Korail. The Uijeongbu light railway is currently being taken over by the Uijeongbu city council (that one’s north of Seoul) after the operating company went bankrupt. And the Everline people mover is operated by a joint venture owned by Bombardier and a variety of Korean companies.

Seoul’s subway map. Click to expand. Image: Wikimedia Commons.

The rest of the lines are operated by the national rail operator Korail. The fare structure is either identical or very similar for all of these lines. All buses and trains in the region are accessible with a T-money card, similar to London’s Oyster card. Fares are collected centrally and then distributed back to operators based on levels of usage.

Funding

The Korean government spends around £27bn on transport every year: that works out at 10 per cent more per person than the British government spends.  The Seoul subway’s annual loss of around £200m is covered by this budget.

The main reason the loss is much lower than TfL’s £458m is that, despite Seoul’s lower fares, it also has much lower maintenance costs. The oldest line, Line 1 is only 44 years old.


Higher levels of automation and lower crime rates also mean there are fewer staff. Workers pay is also lower: a newly qualified driver will be paid around £27,000 a year compared to £49,000 in London.

New infrastructure is paid for by central government. However, investment in the capital does not cause the same regional rivalries as it does in the UK for a variety of reasons. Firstly, investment is not so heavily concentrated in the capital. Five other cities have subways; the second city of Busan has an extensive five-line network.

What’s more, while investment is still skewed towards Seoul, it’s a much bigger city than London, and South Korea is physically a much smaller country than the UK (about the size of Scotland and Wales combined). Some 40 per cent of the national population lives on the Seoul network – and everyone else who lives on the mainland can be in Seoul within 3 hours.

Finally, politically the biggest divide in South Korea is between the south-west and the south-east (the recently ousted President Park Geun-Hye won just 11 per cent of the vote in the south west, while winning 69 per cent in the south-east). Seoul is seen as neutral territory.  

Problems

A driverless train on the Shinbundang Line. Image: Wikicommons.

The system is far from perfect. Seoul’s network is highly radial. It’s incredibly cheap and easy to travel from outer lying areas to the centre, and around the centre itself. But travelling from one of Seoul’s satellite cities to another by public transport is often difficult. A journey from central Goyang (population: 1m) to central Incheon (population: 3m) is around 30 minutes by car. By public transport, it takes around 2 hours. There is no real equivalent of the London Overground.

There is also a lack of fast commuter services. The four-track Seoul Line 1 offers express services to Incheon and Cheonan, and some commuter towns south of the city are covered by intercity services. But most large cities of hundreds of thousands of people within commuting distance (places comparable to Reading or Milton Keynes) are reliant on the subway network, and do not have a fast rail link that takes commuters directly to the city centre.

This is changing however with the construction of a system modelled on the Paris RER and London’s Crossrail. The GTX will operate at maximum speed of 110Mph. The first line (of three planned) is scheduled to open in 2023, and will extend from the new town of Ilsan on the North Korean border to the new town of Dongtan about 25km south of the city centre.

The system will stop much less regularly than Crossrail or the RER resulting in drastic cuts in journey times. For example, the time from llsan to Gangnam (of Gangnam Style fame) will be cut from around 1hr30 to just 17 minutes. When the three-line network is complete most of the major cities in the region will have a direct fast link to Seoul Station, the focal point of the GTX as well as the national rail network. A very good public transport network is going to get even better.