New CCTV cameras can track pedestrians around cities

The system assigns colours and numbers to pedestrians in order to track them across different cameras. Image: University of Washington.

After two pressure cooker bombs exploded during the Boston Marathon in April 2013, killing three and injuring around 300 more, it took police five days to track down the culprits. While thousands of officers scoured a 20-block area, transport systems were shut down and residents told to stay indoors.  

Now, just over a year later, an electrical engineer from the University of Washington says he has developed technology that would have shortened that manhunt to “hours, if not minutes”. 

That engineer is Jenq-Neng Hwang, who has created a system of cameras which use algorithms to track moving objects across large areas – even when they move out of sight of one camera and into the frame of another.

Before the cameras begin tracking, they record “training footage”, to understand how objects change in angles, texture and colour when viewed from the cameras’ respective locations. Once tracking, they assign moving objects colours and numbers, and use the information from the training footage to detect people already identified by another camera.

At the moment, the cameras can’t do this in real time - the technology operates as a faster version of officers searching footage frame-by-frame for suspects. But eventually, Hwang hopes these cameras could operate around cities, on drones and in robots to track suspects or create a kind of moving Google Earth, with maps populated by cars and people. You could, for example, see the traffic on a road you’re about to travel to, or use a tracking drone to find survivors after a natural disaster.   

In the video below, Hwang admits there are “privacy issues” surrounding this vision. But to him, it seems absurd that we collect millions of hours of CCTV footage in cities, only for it to “end up on servers, never to be viewed again”.

One idea that does seem a little excessive is the use of the cameras in shops, to collect what Hwang calls “valuable information about a specific shopper’s preferences”.  While he enticingly says this information would be used to send shoppers “special coupons”, we’d probably rather shop without a robot salesman breathing down our necks.

All images: University of Washington. 

 
 
 
 

Community-powered policies should be at the top of Westminster’s to do list

A generic election picture. Image: Getty.

Over the past five decades, political and economic power has become increasingly concentrated in the UK’s capital. Communities feel ignored or alienated by a politics that feels distant and unrepresentative of their daily experiences.

Since the EU referendum result it has become something of a cliché to talk about how to respond to the sense of powerlessness felt by too many people. The foundations of our economy have been shifted by Brexit, technology and deindustrialisation – and these have shone a light on a growing divergence in views and values across geographies and generations. They are both a symptom and cause of the breakdown of the ties that traditionally brought people together.

As the country goes through seismic changes in its outlook, politics and economy, it is clear that a new way of doing politics is needed. Empowering people to take control over the things that affect their daily lives cannot be done from the top down.

Last week, the Co-operative Party launched our policy platform for the General Election – the ideas and priorities we hope to see at the top of the next Parliament’s to do list. We have been the voice for co-operative values and principles in the places where decisions are made and laws are made. As co-operators, we believe that the principles that lie behind successful co‑operatives – democratic control by customers and workers, and a fair share of the wealth we create together – ought to extend to the wider economy and our society. As Labour’s sister party, we campaign for a government that puts these shared values into practice.

Our policy platform has community power at its heart, because the co-operative movement, founded on shop floors and factory production lines, knows that power should flow from the bottom up. Today, this principle holds strong – decisions are best made by the people impacted the most by them, and services work best when the service users have a voice. Our policy platform is clear: this means shifting power from Whitehall to local government, but it also means looking beyond the town hall. Co-operative approaches are about placing power directly in the hands of people and communities.


There are many great examples of Co-operative councillors and local communities taking the lead on this. Co-operative councils like Oldham and Plymouth have pioneered new working relationships with residents, underpinned by a genuine commitment to working with communities rather than merely doing things to them.

Building a fairer future is, by definition, a bottom-up endeavour. Oldham, Plymouth and examples like the Elephant Project in Greater Manchester, where people with experience of disadvantage are involved in decision-making, or buses in Witney run by Co-operative councillors and the local community – are the building blocks of creating a better politics and a fairer economy.

This thread runs through our work over the last few years on community wealth building too – keeping wealth circulating in local economies through growing the local co-operative sector. Worker-owned businesses thriving at the expense of global corporate giants and private outsourcers. Assets owned by communities – from pubs to post offices to rooftop solar panels.

And it runs through our work in Westminster too – with Co-operative MPs and peers calling for parents, not private business, to own and run nurseries; for the stewards of our countryside to be farmers rather than big landowners; and for workers to have a stake in their workplaces and a share of the profit.

Far from being ignored, as suggested in last week’s article on community power, our work has never been more relevant and our co-operative voice is louder than ever.

Anna Birley is policy offer at the Co-operative party.