How innovative home design could revolutionise dementia care – and even slow down symptoms

The Alzheimer’s Respite Centre. Image: Nick Kane.

When a clip from Dominic Sivyer’s Grandad, Dementia and Me documentary went viral on Facebook last year, I found it really touched a nerve. Like many who shared the video, I’ve known a dementia sufferer. Like many, I’ve suffered the heartbreak of a blank, unrecognising stare from a family member. 

Today, there are roughly 850,000 people living with dementia in the UK, each surrounded by family and friends also bearing the costs – emotional and otherwise – of the debilitating condition. With an ageing population, that number is expected to reach over a million by 2025, yet cash for research and quality of care is still desperately lacking.

As recently as this year, reports suggested that up to a third of dementia patients in the UK are not receiving full, adequate care. Year on year, more sufferers unnecessarily end up in A&E during the final year of their lives. Frequently, the confusion and distress inherent in these visits proves fatal.

The complacent hope is that we’ll have figured out a cure by the time these numbers reach crisis level. While this is, of course, possible, it’s by no means guaranteed. Without a miracle drug on the horizon, it may be time to get creative. For architects like Niall McLaughlin and Yeoryia Manaloupoulous, this means turning to tailored architecture and home design for a solution.

It sounds deceptively simple, but researchers and architects in this niche area have hit on something that has the potential to revolutionise dementia care. Dementia-friendly design, astoundingly, has the power not only to improve the lives of sufferers and cut costs, but also to decelerate symptoms.

Losing Myself, at the 2016 Venice Biennale. Image: Nick Kane.

Through “Losing Myself”, an interactive piece at the 2016 Venice architecture exhibition Biennale, McLaughlin and Manaloupoulous explored this idea at length. Their exhibit was a reflection upon their dementia-friendly “Alzheimer’s Respite Centre”, built in Dublin back in 2010, and invited gallery-goers to traverse a projection that played scrambled moving images of the building, while speakers blared a cacophony of overlapping voices. The idea was to immerse the audience in the experiential qualities of dementia that make wayfinding, spatial orientation and remembering so difficult.

A poignant experience, yet creating empathy with the sensory world of sufferers was just a starting point for these architects. At the Alzheimer’s Respite Centre, this understanding of a dementia patient’s cognitive and perceptive reality precluded every architectural and design choice in and outside of the building. Swirly patterning can appear in motion to sufferers, so interior design is kept deliberately plain. Dementia patients often get confused about where they are and what time of day it is, which designers hope to combat with large windows throughout the centre to let in natural light.


Were you to visit and walk around the garden, you’d eventually notice that every path loops naturally back to the main building, allowing patients to wander independently without getting lost. Toilets visible from the bed remind patients where they are, so that in the morning – when they’re likely to need it – they can access the bathroom without help.

Such features play a key role in improving sufferers’ quality of life, facilitating independence and avoiding the dreaded “institution” atmosphere. But the really revolutionary aspect of dementia-friendly design, of course, is its potential to actually alleviate common symptoms. Several American studies have backed this theory; recording, amongst other things, less aggressive behaviour and longer sleep duration in patients who are exposed to greater amounts of natural light. One even found that patients living in a facility with long corridors (making wayfinding more difficult) had more advanced psychiatric symptoms after a six-month period than those living in a more easily navigable “L”-shaped space.

McLaughlin and Manaloupoulou aren’t the only ones to see the potential benefits. Just last year, Scottish architect David Burgher developed a virtual reality tool that allows users to experience the visual impairments of a dementia sufferer, hoping that better understanding of the condition will breed better architecture. Liverpool John Moores’ ongoing “design for dementia” research project aims to set new architectural standards for dementia design, speculating that it may eventually become possible to adjust existing homes for sufferers rather than building new ones. With so many patients wishing to remain at home for as long as possible, researching, funding and implementing dementia-friendly design could be a lifeline for thousands as we continue to search for a cure.  

 
 
 
 

What’s killing northerners?

The Angel of the North. Image: Getty.

There is a stark disparity in wealth and health between people in the north and south of England, commonly referred to as England’s “north-south divide”. The causes of this inequality are complex; it’s influenced by the environment, jobs, migration and lifestyle factors – as well as the long-term political power imbalances, which have concentrated resources and investment in the south, especially in and around London.

Life expectancy is also lower in the north, mainly because the region is more deprived. But new analysis of national mortality data highlights a shockingly large mortality gap between young adults, aged 25 to 44, living in the north and south of England. This gap first emerged in the late 1990s, and seems to have been growing ever since.

In 1995, there were 2% more deaths among northerners aged 25 to 34 than southerners (in other words, 2% “excess mortality”). But by 2015, northerners in this age group were 29% more likely to die than their southern counterparts. Likewise, in the 35 to 44 age group, there was 3% difference in mortality between northerners and southerners in 1995. But by 2015, there were 49% more deaths among northerners than southerners in this age group.

Excess mortality in the north compared with south of England by age groups, from 1965 to 2015. Follow the lines to see that people born around 1980 are the ones most affected around 2015.

While mortality increased among northerners aged 25 to 34, and plateaued among 35 to 44-year-olds, southern mortality mainly declined across both age groups. Overall, between 2014 and 2016, northerners aged 25 to 44 were 41% more likely to die than southerners in the same age group. In real terms, this means that between 2014 and 2016, 1,881 more women and 3,530 more men aged between 25 and 44 years died in the north, than in the south.

What’s killing northerners?

To understand what’s driving this mortality gap among young adults, our team of researchers looked at the causes of death from 2014 to 2016, and sorted them into eight groups: accidents, alcohol related, cardiovascular related (heart conditions, diabetes, obesity and so on), suicide, drug related, breast cancer, other cancers and other causes.

Controlling for the age and sex of the population in the north and the south, we found that it was mostly the deaths of northern men contributing to the difference in mortality – and these deaths were caused mainly by cardiovascular conditions, alcohol and drug misuse. Accidents (for men) and cancer (for women) also played important roles.

From 2014 to 2016, northerners were 47% more likely to die for cardiovascular reasons, 109% for alcohol misuse and 60% for drug misuse, across both men and women aged 25 to 44 years old. Although the national rate of death from cardiovascular reasons has dropped since 1981, the longstanding gap between north and south remains.

Death and deprivation

The gap in life expectancy between north and south is usually put down to socioeconomic deprivation. We considered further data for 2016, to find out if this held true for deaths among young people. We found that, while two thirds of the gap were explained by the fact that people lived in deprived areas, the remaining one third could be caused by some unmeasured form of deprivation, or by differences in culture, infrastructure, migration or extreme weather.

Mortality for people aged 25 to 44 years in 2016, at small area geographical level for the whole of England.

Northern men faced a higher risk of dying young than northern women – partly because overall mortality rates are higher for men than for women, pretty much at every age, but also because men tend to be more susceptible to socioeconomic pressures. Although anachronistic, the expectation to have a job and be able to sustain a family weighs more on men. Accidents, alcohol misuse, drug misuse and suicide are all strongly associated with low socioeconomic status.

Suicide risk is twice as high among the most deprived men, compared to the most affluent. Suicide risk has also been associated with unemployment, and substantial increases in suicide have been observed during periods of recession – especially among men. Further evidence tells us that unskilled men between ages 25 and 39 are between ten and 20 times more likely to die from alcohol-related causes, compared to professionals.

Alcohol underpins the steep increase in liver cirrhosis deaths in Britain from the 1990s – which is when the north-south divide in mortality between people aged 25 to 44 also started to emerge. Previous research has shown that men in this age group, who live in the most deprived areas, are five times more likely to die from alcohol-related diseases than those in the most affluent areas. For women in deprived areas, the risk is four times greater.


It’s also widely known that mortality rates for cancer are higher in more deprived areas, and people have worse survival rates in places where smoking and alcohol abuse is more prevalent. Heroin and crack cocaine addiction and deaths from drug overdoses are also strongly associated with deprivation.

The greater number of deaths from accidents in the north should be considered in the context of transport infrastructure investment, which is heavily skewed towards the south – especially London, which enjoys the lowest mortality in the country. What’s more, if reliable and affordable public transport is not available, people will drive more and expose themselves to higher risk of an accident.

Deaths for young adults in the north of England have been increasing compared to those in the south since the late 1990s, creating new health divides between England’s regions. It seems that persistent social, economic and health inequalities are responsible for a growing trend of psychological distress, despair and risk taking among young northerners. Without major changes, the extreme concentration of power, wealth and opportunity in the south will continue to damage people’s health, and worsen the north-south divide.

The Conversation

Evangelos Kontopantelis, Professor in Data Science and Health Services Research, University of Manchester

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.