Autumn statement: Letting fees are awful, and Philip Hammond is right to ban them

Chancellor Philip Hammond enjoys a private joke somewhere in the Autumn Statement. Image: Getty.

A tragedy, in one graph:

Isn’t that awful? Isn’t that the saddest thing you’ve ever seen? A universally adored brand like Foxtons, losing a tenth of its value in an hour off the back of one bit of bad news? It couldn’t happen to a nicer firm. Perhaps it’s time for the inaugural CityMetric Christmas appeal.

Or we could not do that, on the grounds that banning letting agents fees is a thoroughly good thing, and estate agents are awful.

The move, which chancellor Philip Hammond is announcing in today’s Autumn Statement, will bar lettings agents in England and Wales from demanding tenants pay whatever fees they happen to feel like. (Those in Scotland are already barred from doing so.)

Lettings agents do have costs, of course: reference checks, credit checks, repairing the deliberate damage passers-by do to those minis in examples of what are basically hate crimes. In future, though, they’ll have to recoup them through landlords, rather than tenants.

The whiny, kneejerk, “pro-business” critique of this policy runs as follows. Any attempt to interfere in the operation of the free market will necessarily harm the weakest participants in that market. If letting agents pass their costs onto landlords, landlords will in turn pass them onto tenants. Ergo, the real victims of any attempt to stop lettings agents from torturing tenants any way they happen to feel like it will be tenants themselves.

This critique is, of course, a steaming pile of horseshit, spread about by the sort of people who have no shame about publicly announcing that they’ve not thought very hard about this and probably aren’t actually that clever. For one thing it’s obviously ridiculous. They’re banning parasitical middle men from demanding hundreds of pounds with menaces from renters whenever they have to do some photocopying – and you think that will actually harm renters? Are you high?


But no, let’s be fair to them and destroy their argument using actual logic. Yes, lettings agents do have costs. But there is no evidence that the fees they charge reflect those costs. Occasional CityMetric contributor Alex Parsons put together a report on this, available on the website lettingfees.co.uk. He found that the cost of new tenancy agreements varied from £48 to £450.

Administrative costs clearly don’t vary by a factor of 10: some of those letting agents are charging inflated fees, not because they have to, but because they can. By the time the fee is due, most tenants will have committed to their new home: the agents have them over a barrel. They’re price-gouging, and they should stop.

But there are legitimate costs, of course. Won’t these be passed onto tenants in higher rents? Very possibly – because, while the availability of property won’t change, the availability of money to pay for it will.

Even this is no bad thing, though, since at least they will be passed on consistently. At the moment it’s impossible for tenants to compare the real price of a new home, because are not shown in the advertised rent. Banning letting fees will introduce a much needed measure of transparency to the market.

There are other benefits to a ban. The added costs are likely to be more managable if paid as part of the rent, rather than in a single, upfront lump. It also means an end to unpredictable extra fees, when individual tenants leave houseshares or contracts otherwise need amending.

But if you’re still not convinced, there’s one more way you can tell that the real victims of this policy will be estate agents, rather than tenants. It’s this:

There is a reason that has happened: investors think this policy means that less money will now be going to Foxtons.

It’s a tragedy. A real tragedy, I tell you.

Jonn Elledge is the editor of CityMetric. He is on Twitter, far too much, as @jonnelledge.

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Coming soon: CityMetric will relaunch as City Monitor, a new publication dedicated to the future of cities

Coming soon!

Later this month, CityMetric will be relaunching with an entirely new look and identity, as well as an expanded editorial mission. We’ll become City Monitor, a name that reflects both a ramping up of our ambitions as well as our membership in a network of like-minded publications coming soon from New Statesman Media Group. We can’t wait to share the new website with you, but in the meantime, here’s what CityMetric readers should know about what to expect from this exciting transition.  

Regular CityMetric readers may have already noticed a few changes around here since the spring. CityMetric’s beloved founding editor, Jonn Elledge, has moved on to some new adventures, and a new team has formed to take the site into the future. It’s led by yours truly – I’m Sommer Mathis, the editor-in-chief of City Monitor. Hello!

My background includes having served as the founding editor of CityLab, editor-in-chief of Atlas Obscura, and editor-in-chief of DCist, a local news publication in the District of Columbia. I’ve been reporting on and writing about cities in one way or another for the past 15 years. To me, there is no more important story in the world right now than how cities are changing and adapting to an increasingly challenging global landscape. The majority of the world’s population lives in cities, and if we’re ever going to be able to tackle the most pressing issues currently facing our planet – the climate emergency, rising inequality, the Covid-19 pandemic ­­­– cities are going to have to lead the way.

That’s why City Monitor is going to be a global publication dedicated to the future of cities everywhere – not just in the UK (nor for that matter just in the US, where I live). Our mission will be to help our readers, many of whom are in leadership positions around the globe, navigate how cities are changing and discover what’s next in the world of urban policy. We’ll do that through original reporting, expert opinion and most crucially, a data-driven approach that emphasises evidence and rigorous analysis. We want to arm local decision-makers and those they work in concert with – whether that’s elected officials, bureaucratic leaders, policy advocates, neighbourhood activists, academics and researchers, entrepreneurs, or plain-old engaged citizens – with real insights and potential answers to tough problems. Subjects we’ll cover include transportation, infrastructure, housing, urban design, public safety, the environment, the economy, and much more.

The City Monitor team is made up of some of the most experienced urban policy journalists in the world. Our managing editor is Adam Sneed, also a CityLab alum where he served as a senior associate editor. Before that he was a technology reporter at Politico. Allison Arieff is City Monitor’s senior editor. She was previously editorial director of the urban planning and policy think tank SPUR, as well as a contributing columnist for The New York Times. Staff writer Jake Blumgart most recently covered development, housing, and politics for WHYY, the local public radio station in Philadelphia. And our data reporter is Alexandra Kanik, whose previous roles include data reporting for Louisville Public Media in Kentucky and PublicSource in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Our team will continue to grow in the coming weeks, and we’ll also be collaborating closely with our editorial colleagues across New Statesman Media Group. In fact, we’re launching a whole network of new publications this fall, covering topics such as the clean energy transition, foreign direct investment, technology, banks and more. Many of these sectors will frequently overlap with our cities coverage, and a key part of our plan is make the most of the expertise that all of these newsrooms combined will bring to bear on our journalism.

City Monitor will go live later this month. In the meantime, please visit citymonitor.ai to sign up for our forthcoming email newsletter.


As for CityMetric, some of its archives have already been moved over to the new website, and the rest will follow not long after. If you’re looking for a favourite piece from CityMetric’s past, for a time you’ll still be able to find it here, but before long the whole archive will move over to City Monitor.

On behalf of the City Monitor team, I’m thrilled to invite you to come along for the ride at our forthcoming digs. You can already follow City Monitor on LinkedIn, and on Twitter, sign up or keep following our existing account, which will switch over to our new name shortly. If you’re interested in learning more about the potential for a commercial partnership with City Monitor, please get in touch with our director of partnerships, Joe Maughan.

I want to thank and congratulate Jonn Elledge on a brilliant run. Everything we do from here on out will be building on the legacy of his work, and the community that he built here at CityMetric. Cheers, Jonn!

In the meantime, stay tuned, and thank you from all of us for being a loyal CityMetric reader. We couldn’t have done any of this without you.

Sommer Mathis is editor-in-chief of City Monitor.