You can spend a whole day on the Tokyo rail network for just 90p. Here’s how

Your carriage awaits: a Japan Rail train. Image: Getty.

Let’s cut to the chase: you’re here, reading this website, so you probably like trains. Trains are cool. Rail network maps are cool. Spending a day on trains is cool.

But the cost of travel can add up, especially if you venture far afield. So here’s the part that’s going to blow your mind: there’s a way to spend all day on trains for about a pound.

Have you ever, just for larks, gone the long way round on a rail or metro network? Travelled between Cowcaddens and Buchanan Street in Glasgow, but via Govan? Between Mornington Crescent and King’s Cross in London, but via Kennington instead of changing at Euston? Got the lower fare on London Overground travelling between Clapham Junction and Highbury & Islington?

There’s a name for this in Japan: 大回り乗車 which is pronounced “oomawari jousha” and literally means “big ride”. It means you can buy the cheapest ticket available and travel round the whole network, and staff will nod at the practice. (Hopefully. If they don't, do your best stupid foreigner face, say “oomawari jousha” and point out your route on a map. Should work.)

Like everything brilliant in this world there’s a catch, though, and here it’s that you can’t leave the rail network and explore. But why would you want to do that? You like trains, remember?

We first learned about this practice from excellent website Tokyo Cheapo, which you should absolutely check out if you’re ever planning a trip. (Full disclosure: I occasionally write for sister sites Japan Cheapo and London Cheapo.) It works like this.

  • Buy a ticket for the metro. The cheapest on the Tokyo Metro is 140 yen, which at the current exchange rate is about 90p.
  • You can only travel on Japan Rail (JR) lines. You can ask about oomawari jousha on a private line, but your language skills probably aren’t up to that and anyway, JR has the most extensive network.
  • You can’t travel on the bullet or express trains. You’re paying a pound, come on.
  • You can’t go beyond the gate line until you’re finished or you’ll have to pay the full fare. You also have to be back by the end of the day else your ticket won't be valid.
  • You have to start and finish your journey within the paid-for fare zone. So in Tokyo you would, for example, start in Shibuya and finally exit at Ebisu, one stop along the Yamanote line.

That’s the basics over. Where can you actually visit? You’re limited to the suburban networks but in reality that means you can go miles out of the way. Here’s a map:

Let’s look at some potential routes.


Go west

Start at Shinjuku station, partly because it’s the busiest station in the world and you might as well join in. Pick up some food for the journey – some larger stations have shops and restaurants within the gate line, but you don’t want to be caught out. Buy a 140 yen ticket and head for the Saikyo line and catch the 09:46 train to Akabane. From here, catch the Takasaki line to, well, Takasaki and enjoy the view as you travel into the mountains of Gunma prefecture.

At Takasaki, switch to the Joetsu line to Minakami, which is the technical limit of how far you can go – the line continues, but it’s at your own risk. So far you’ve travelled 161km and it should take around 200 minutes to get here.

Let’s go back a different way, because we can. You should have got into Minakami at 13:07, so take an hour to admire the view from the station platforms before catching the 14:19 train to Shim-Maebashi, then hopping on the Ryomo line to Oyama. Congratulations, you’re now entering Tochigi prefecture. At Oyama, change for the Mito line to Tomobe (in Ibaraki prefecture, you’re really racking them up now).

At Tomobe, catch the Joban line back towards Tokyo, changing at Nippori for the Yamanote line (Tokyo’s version of the Circle line) before getting out at Shin-Okubo – one stop down from Shinjuku.

Your return journey from Minakami takes six hours and covers 295km. You have paid 140 yen to travel 456km. You are the train monarch.

Go south

If mountains aren’t your thing, how about the coast? The Boso Peninsular juts out to the south-west of Tokyo, with the Pacific to the east and Tokyo Bay to the west. Railway lines hug the coastline. So let’s eyeball all that scenery for 140 yen.

Start at Tokyo station (that’s the specific station called Tokyo in Tokyo, because nobody ever said Tokyo was easy). Buy your 140 yen ticket and catch the 09:43 train on the Sobu line to Chiba, where you change to the Sotobo line. (Actually, I suspect this is the same train, as there’s a one minute transfer window and the arrival and departure platforms are the same.)

Anyway: you’re now headed to Kazusa-Ichinomiya, where you switch to a train for Awa-Kamogawa. This section takes around an hour, and you’ll start to get an ocean view. At Awa-Kamogawa, catch a train to Tateyama, which will carry on down the coast before cutting across the bottom of the peninsula after Chikura.

So far you’ve travelled 166km and it’s taken 200 minutes, assuming you catch all the connections. Now you need to travel back up the west side. Get on the Uchibo line to Kimitsu, where you switch to a rapid train to Chiba. At Chiba you’re getting back on the Sobu line (again, pretty sure you just stay on the same train), where you can either go straight back to Tokyo or make a couple of changes via Kinshicho and Akihabara.

But you can’t get out at Tokyo! You have to exit one stop along, so get on the Yamanote line and leave the network either at Kanda or Yurakucho.

The route back is 130km and takes 160 minutes. The whole journey is 296km and gets you back in time to enjoy your evening.

Go Osaka

Tokyo’s not the only city you can do oomawari jousha in. Osaka is perfectly positioned as a hub for many fascinating Japanese cities, so let’s see how many you can hit up in a day.

The limit in Osaka is almost, but not quite, the blue section on this JR West map (you can compare it with the Osaka map, second one down, on the Japan Rail website). Your ticket is even cheaper than in Tokyo too, at 120 yen.

Start at Osaka station by catching the 08:59 train to Kyoto, where you change for a train to Nara, famed for its ancient wooden temples and free-roaming deer. Not that you’re going to see any of that (though if you really want to get out, the fare for the journey so far is only 800 yen, you cheapskate).

Now you’re heading further south. Catch the 10:41 train on the Manyo Mahoroba line heading for Wakayama; looks like the train turns into the Wakayama line at Takada, after which you get a nice two hour trundle through Wakayama prefecture.

At Wakayama it’s time to head north again. Get on the Kishuji line for Hineno, where the train will magically turn into a Kansai Airport train bound for Osaka. Back at Osaka, catch a train to Himeji. This is a famous castle town, and lucky for you it can be seen from the station.

There’s about an hour waiting at Himeji, so watch the shinkansen whizz through and eat the food you hopefully bought before setting off. At 18:11, take a brief hop to Kakogawa where you change for a train to Nishiwakishi, because we’re taking the long route back to Osaka. At Nishiwakishi, take the Kakogawa line to Tanikawa, where you change onto the Takarazuka line back to Osaka. Now you just need to hop one station on the Osaka loop to Temma or Fukushima to finish at 10pm.

This route covers 496km. If you paid normal fares it’d cost 6,460 yen (roughly £43). Haha, suckers.

For more details on route planning, use HyperDia and JR’s suburban maps for Tokyo, Osaka, Fukuoka, Niigata and Sendai, which are the cities oomawari jousha works in. The maps are in Japanese and image-only so you can’t even copy and paste the city names into Google Translate – but the regional train companies will have English language network maps that you can spend ages flipping between the two trying to compare and contrast.

And if this isn’t how you like spending your evenings, this whole article has probably not been for you.

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“One of the greatest opportunities facing our region”: Andy Burnham on making work better for older people

Andy Burnham (then health secretary) and Gordon Brown (then prime minister) meeting an older voter in 2010. Image: Getty.

In the Greater Manchester Strategy, published by the Combined Authority in October, we set out our vision for Greater Manchester, including our ambitions for employment.

It’s not simply about getting more people into work – though this is important, given that our employment rate across the region is still below the national average. It’s also about improving the quality of work; creating better jobs with opportunities for people to progress and develop. That’s why we’re working towards a Good Employer Charter to encourage businesses across the region to step up.

But if we want to make a real difference for the people of Greater Manchester, we need to focus on those who currently struggle most to find a job, including people with disabilities, people with fewer qualifications – and older people.

One in three people aged between 50 and 64 in the Greater Manchester area are out of work. Adding in older workers on low pay, nearly half (46.3 per cent) of 50-64 year olds in Greater Manchester are either out of work or in low paid, low quality jobs. This is a bad situation at any age – in your 50s, with fewer chances to get back into work and less time to make up the shortfall in income and savings, it’s terrible.

It’s also bad for the region. People out of work are more likely to have or develop health problems, and need more care and support from our public services. We are also missing out on the skills and experience of thousands of residents. If Greater Manchester’s employment rate for 50-64 year olds matched the UK average, there would be 19,000 more people in work – earning, spending and paying into the local economy. GVA in the region could grow by £800m pa if we achieved this. 

If it’s bad now, it’s only going to get worse unless we act. This is the fastest growing age group among working age people in Greater Manchester. And with the rise in State Pension Age, we are no longer talking about 50-64 year olds, but 50-65, 66 and eventually 67. There are more older workers, and we are working for longer. Many of us are now expecting to work into our 70s to be able to earn enough for our later lives.


As the State Pension age rises, older people without decent work must struggle for longer without an income before they can draw their pension. But if we approach this right, we can improve people’s lives and benefit our local economy at the same time. It makes financial and social sense.

Older people bring a wealth of knowledge and experience to the workplace, but we must make sure we provide a work environment that enables them to flourish. If we can help them get into good quality, suitable work, older people will be able to retain their financial independence and continue contributing to the region’s economy.

A report published earlier this week by the Centre for Ageing Better looks at exactly this issue. Part of our strategic partnership with the Centre for Ageing Better, the report is based on research conducted over six months with older residents in five communities with high levels of economic disadvantage across Greater Manchester.

In Brinnington, Stockport, the team met Adrian, in his late 50s. Adrian is a trained electrician, but since being made redundant ten years ago, has only managed to get a few short-term contracts. These short term, zero hours contracts, are “more trouble than they’re worth” and have left Adrian stressed and worse-off financially.

He has been sent on a large number of employment-related courses by JobCentre Plus, and has a CV with two pages listing training he has completed. However, these courses were of little interest to him and did not relate to his aim of finding stable work as an electrician. He told the team he only attended most of the courses so he “doesn’t get in trouble”.

Adrian recognises there are other types of work available, but much of it is warehouse based and as he is not in the best physical health he does not feel this work is suitable. He said he has “given up” on finding work – even though he still has 8 or 9 years to go until State Pension age.

Adrian’s story shows how badly the system is failing people like him – highly skilled, in a trade that’s in high demand, but being put through the motions of support in ways that make no sense for him.

A major finding of the report was the high number of people in this age group who had both caring responsibilities and their own health problems. With the need to manage their own health, and the high cost of paying for care, people found that they were not better off in low paid work. Several people shared stories of the complexity of coming off income support to take up temporary work and how this left them worse off financially – in some cases in severe debt.

The report concludes that changes are needed at every level to tackle chronic worklessness amongst this age group. This is not something that employment and skills services alone can fix, although Adrian’s story shows they can be much better at dealing with people as individuals, and this is something we want to do more on in Greater Manchester. But the health and benefits systems need to work in sync with employment support, and this is a national as well as a local issue.

Employers too need to do more to support older workers and prevent them from falling out of the labour market in the first place. This means more flexible working arrangements to accommodate common challenges such as health issues or caring responsibilities, and ensuring recruitment and other processes don’t discriminate against this age group.  

Greater Manchester has been at the forefront of devolution and has been using its powers to bring together health, skills and employment support to improve the lives of local people. The Working Well programme is a perfect example of this, providing integrated and personalised support to over 18,000 people, and delivering fantastic outcomes and value for money.

Such an approach could clearly be expanded even further to include the needs of older people. Ageing Better’s report shows that more can and needs to be done, and we will use their insights as we prepare our age-friendly strategy for Greater Manchester

We have to act now. In 20 years’ time, over a third of the population of Greater Manchester will be over 50. Making work better for all of us as we age is one of the greatest economic and social opportunities facing our city region.

Andy Burnham is the mayor of Greater Manchester.

For more about the work of Greater Manchester Combined Authority and its Ageing Hub, click here.