In pictures: Do cars take up too much space on city streets?

Traffic in Bangkok, Thailand. Image: Roland Dobbins at Wikimedia Commons.

A while ago, we ran some images of cyclists in Latvia protesting in favour of more bike lanes. They'd strapped neon pieces of wood to their bike frames so as they cycled on Riga's rush-hour roads, they took up the same amount of space as cars:

 

The protest made an important point: that, of all the arguments in favour of cutting the number of cars on our roads, perhaps the most compelling is one that doesn't rely on a belief in climate change, or even statistics on car-releated deaths. It's their sheer size. 

The fact is, in cities where space is limited, giant, motorized boxes carrying an average of two or three people are a massively inefficient form of transport. Handing over a huge proportion of our public space (it's around 80 per cent in London) to roads populated overridingly by cars might not be the best idea either. 

The Latvian protest was far from the first to make this argument. Here are some of the other visualisations we think make the point best.

How much space do cars actually take up?

The Copenhagenize cycling blog recently analysed transport modes at intersections in Paris, Calgary and Tokyo. The resulting diagrams, which compare the number of transporation devices with the space given over to them, look a little like this:

Image: Copenhagenize

The clusters of dots in small areas shows how space for cars seems to be prioritised. Or, as the blog's creator, Mikael Colville-Anderson, would have it, the "blatant injustice of space allocation". 

What if roads were giant holes in the ground?

Twitter, via @ThinkCritical12.

Ok, this one's a bit dramatic. But for busy streets, or in cities where jaywalking's illegal, it's not such a ridiculous representation. At the very least, the picture highlights just how much space is taken up by roads, compared to crosswalks and sidewalks. 

How much space do 69 people take up?

This next image was created by the Cycling Promotion Fund earlier this year. It shows how much road space a group of people take up using cars, a bus, bikes, or standing in a group:

Turns out it's not such a new concept, though. This bus promotion poster circulated in London in the 1960s:

Passive aggressive bike parking spaces

These bike parking areas, like our friends the Latvian cyclists, make a pointed comment on how space usually occupied by cars can be used. A single parking space, it turns out, could store 10 to 15 bikes.

Image: Cyclehoop.

For more on parking, see this video on how Zurich froze the number of downtown parking spaces in 1996 and, amazingly, the city continued to function. In this case, demand fell with parking supply: once cars weren't so convenient, residents turned to walking, cycling and public transport. 

 
 
 
 

Two east London boroughs are planning to tax nightlife to fund the clean up. Will it work?

A Shoreditch rave, 2013. Image: Getty.

No-one likes cleaning up after a party, but someone’s got to do it. On a city-wide scale, that job falls to the local authority. But that still leaves the question: who pays?

In east London, the number of bars and clubs has increased dramatically in recent years. The thriving club scene has come with benefits – but also a price tag for the morning clean-up and cost of policing. The boroughs of Hackney and Tower Hamlets are now looking to nightlife venues to cover these costs.

Back in 2012, councils were given powers to introduce ‘late night levies’: essentially a tax on all the licensed venues that open between midnight and 6am. The amount venues are expected to pay is based on the premises’ rateable value. Seventy per cent of any money raised goes to the police and the council keeps the rest.

Few councils took up the offer. Four years after the legislation was introduced, only eight local authorities had introduced a levy, including Southampton, Nottingham, and Cheltenham. Three of the levies were in the capital, including Camden and Islington. The most lucrative was in the City of London, where £420,000 was raised in the 2015-16 financial year.

Even in places where levies have been introduced, they haven’t always had the desired effect. Nottingham adopted a late night levy in November 2014. Last year, it emerged that the tax had raised £150,000 less than expected in its first year. Only a few months before, Cheltenham scrapped its levy after it similarly failed to meet expectations.


Last year, the House of Lords committee published its review of the 2003 Licensing Act. The committee found that “hardly any respondents believed that late night levies were currently working as they should be” – and councils reported that the obligation to pass revenues from the levy to the police had made the tax unappealing. Concluding its findings on the late night levy, the committee said: “We believe on balance that it has failed to achieve its objectives, and should be abolished.”

As might be expected of a nightlife tax, late night levies are also vociferously opposed by the hospitality industry. Commenting on the proposed levy in Tower Hamlets, Brigid Simmonds, chief executive at the British Beer and Pub Association, said: “A levy would represent a damaging new tax – it is the wrong approach. The focus should be on partnership working, with the police and local business, to address any issues in the night time economy.”

Nevertheless, boroughs in east London are pressing ahead with their plans. Tower Hamlets was recently forced to restart a consultation on its late night levy after a first attempt was the subject of a successful legal challenge by the Association of Licensed Multiple Retailers (ALMR). Kate Nicholls, chief executive at the ALMR, said:

“We will continue to oppose these measures wherever they are considered in any part of the UK and will urge local authorities’ to work with businesses, not against them, to find solutions to any issues they may have.”

Meanwhile, Hackney council intends to introduce a levy after a consultation which revealed 52 per cents of respondents were in favour of the plans. Announcing the consultation in February, licensing chair Emma Plouviez said:

“With ever-shrinking budgets, we need to find a way to ensure the our nightlife can continue to operate safely, so we’re considering looking to these businesses for a contribution towards making sure their customers can enjoy a safe night out and their neighbours and surrounding community doesn’t suffer.”

With budgets stretched, it’s inevitable that councils will seek to take advantage of any source of income they can. Nevertheless, earlier examples of the late night levy suggest this nightlife tax is unlikely to prove as lucrative as is hoped. Even if it does, should we expect nightlife venues to plug the gap left by public sector cuts?