A nationalised railway doesn’t have to be rubbish – but this one probably would be

The good old days. Image: Getty

As the general election nears, the major parties are starting to set out their vision for Great Britain’s railways. The Conservative manifesto will appear later this week. Think-tanks associated with the sillier end of the party have lobbied for Network Rail to be privatised, which would be a disaster, so it’s worth keeping a look out.

But Labour’s manifesto was published on Tuesday. Stephen Bush has a good summary, and you can read the whole thing here. One of its more eye-catching pledges is “public ownership” for the railways.

As we’ve covered before, this covers a lot of ground. Network Rail, which owns the tracks, operates maintenance and signalling, manages new-build projects, and allocates and manages train paths, has been in the public sector since 2002, and under the direct control of the Department for Transport (DfT) since 2014.

The manifesto clarifies Labour’s line with the phrase “as franchises expire”. This implies it’s talking about train operating companies (TOCs), like Chiltern or Northern Rail. These are contracted by the DfT to run passenger train services: every few years there is a bidding auction to see who’ll pay the biggest premium for the right to operate trains on a given route.

The winning bidder must meet a service specification agreed with the DfT, pay track charges to Network Rail, lease the trains that are needed to operate the service, and pay staff. In exchange, it gets to set and collect fares on the route, subject to price caps laid down by the DfT, and to keep whatever’s left once it’s paid everyone else.

So if Labour wins a majority in next month’s election, then when franchises start expiring, they will be delivered in-house. There is a model for this, which has been successful on a small scale: the DfT has a subsidiary called Directly Operated Railways, which takes over from a franchisee if they go bust. When National Express East Coast went bust in 2009, DOR took the franchise and provided a good service. Although it fell short of the premiums NXEC had originally pledged to pay, it returned £235m in profit to the DfT in its final year of operation.

There are, however, two problems seeking to apply this small-scale success to Labour’s plans. One is simple scalability. When East Coast was benchmarked against private operators, it was very clear to everyone involved what a good job consisted of. But if the entire business is nationalised, there’s no obvious way to determine whether the public operator is providing good value for money, and not much incentive for it to do so.

There are structures that maintain benchmarking and competition under government control. The most obvious is in London, where TfL sets all aspects of the service and takes all the profit/loss risk, but ensures value for money by contracting out some operations. The same could be done by devolved regional governments (which would also enhance local accountability), and directly by the DfT for long distance and regional services.


This isn’t what’s happening, though. Labour’s pledge that the new operator “will be built on the platform of Network Rail” sounds more like an attempt to recreate the monolithic structure of British Rail. This is, at best, untested in the modern era.

The second problem with Labour’s manifesto version of nationalisation is the side promises being made. Explicit pledges include “ending the expansion of driver only operation” and “freezing fares”.

The first of these is a bad idea. Driver-only operation is a proven safe way of reducing costs without inconveniencing passengers, already used on 30 per cent of the network. The pledge has been modified from an earlier leaked draft which suggested DOO should be abolished altogether, but refusing to expand it takes away an opportunity to cut costs, with no benefit to passengers.

The second helps passengers more, but it’ll be expensive. Regulated train fares rise in line with inflation at about 2 per cent a year (1.8 per cent or 2.3 per cent, depending on whose methodology you use). With farebox revenue of £9.4bn, that’s an extra £200m a year to find in year 1, and £400m in year 2. After five years, there’ll be a £1bn/year gap compared to currently planned rises. And regulated fares are mainly used on already-full commuter trains, so there won’t be much volume growth to make up it.

Will abolishing TOCs pay for this? Annual TOC profits distributed to shareholders are £200m per year. So if the scale issues can be solved and the new model works as well as East Coast, then the savings in the first year will pay for the fares freeze. Hooray!

But this is a one-off gain: in the second year, we’ll need to find another £200m to pay for that year’s fare freeze. By year five, there’ll be a £800m/year revenue gap. AAnd we won’t be able to save money on guards to make up for it.

Overall, Labour’s rail plans are less terrifying and damaging than some of the options the Conservatives are contemplating – and there’s certainly nothing wrong with moving away from the TOC model in itself.

But the devil is in the detail, and the details here suggest that Labour’s plans are more focused on quid-pro-quos for the unions and cash bungs for commuters, than on the actual reason you might want to move away from the TOC model: the core job of shifting more people and freight onto the railways as efficiently and safely as possible.

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How can we stop city breaks killing our cities?

This couple may look happy, but they’re destroying Barcelona. Image: Getty.

Can’t wait to pack your bags and head off on holiday again? It used to be that people would look forward to a long break in summer – but now tourists have got used to regular short breaks through the year. We love to jet off to the world’s glittering cities, even if only for a day or two. The trouble is, binge travelling may be killing the places we visit.

You may even have seen some “tourists go home” graffiti on your last trip, and it’s not hard to see why. Barcelona is a good example of how a city can groan under the weight of its popularity. It now has the busiest cruise port, and the second fastest growing airport in Europe. Walking through the Barcelona streets at peak season (which now never seems to end) flings you into a relentless stream of tourists. They fill the city’s hot spots in search of “authentic” tapas and sangria, and a bit of culture under the sun. The mayor has echoed residents’ concerns over the impact of tourism; a strategic plan has been put in place.

It is true though, that cities tend to start managing the impact of tourism only when it is already too late. It creeps up on them. Unlike visitors to purpose-built beach destinations and national parks, city-break tourists use the same infrastructure as the locals: existing systems start slowly to stretch at the seams. Business travellers, stag parties and museum visitors will all use existing leisure facilities.

‘Meet the friendly locals’, they said. Image: Sterling Ely/Flickrcreative commons.

Barcelona may only be the 59th largest city in the world, but it is the 12th most popular with international visitors. Compared to London or Paris, it is small, and tourism has spiked sharply since the 1992 Olympics rather than grown steadily as in other European favourites like Rome.

Growth is relentless. The UN World Tourism Organisation (UNWTO) even speaks about tourism as a right for all citizens, and citizens are increasingly exercising that right: from 1bn international travellers today, we will grow to 1.8bn by 2030, according to UNWTO forecasts.

Faced with this gathering storm, just who is tourism supposed to benefit? Travellers, cities, residents or the tourism industry?

Market forces

Managing the impact of tourism starts by changing the way destinations market themselves: once the tourists arrive, it’s too late. Tourism authorities need to understand that they are accountable to the city, not to the tourism industry. When the city of Barcelona commissioned the University of Surrey to look into how it might best promote sustainable development, we found a series of techniques which have been incorporated, at least in part, into the city’s 2020 Tourism Strategy.

In the simplest terms, the trick is to cajole tourists into city breaks which are far less of a burden on the urban infrastructure. In other words, normalising the consumption of sustainable tourism products and services. In Copenhagen, 70 per cent of the hotels are certified as sustainable and the municipal authority demands sustainability from its suppliers.

Higher than the sun. A primal scream from the world’s cities? Image: Josep Tomàs/Flickr/creative commons.

Destinations must also be accountable for the transport impact of their visitors. The marketing department might prefer a Japanese tourist to Barcelona because on average they will spend €40 more than a French tourist – according to unpublished data from the Barcelona Tourist Board – but the carbon footprint we collectively pay for is not taken into account.

Crucially, for the kind of city breaks we might enjoy in Barcelona, most of the carbon footprint from your holiday is from your transport. Short breaks therefore pollute more per night, and so destinations ought to be fighting tooth and nail to get you to stay longer. It seems like a win for tourists too: a few extra days in the Spanish sun, a more relaxing break, and all accompanied by the warm glow of self-satisfaction and a gold star for sustainability.


Destinations can also target customers that behave the most like locals. Japanese first-time visitors to Barcelona will crowd the Sagrada Familia cathedral, while most French tourists are repeat visitors that will spread out to lesser-known parts of the city. Reducing seasonality by emphasising activities that can be done in winter or at less crowded times, and geographically spreading tourism by improving less popular areas and communicating their particular charms can also help reduce pressure on hot spots, much like Amsterdam is doing.

Turnover is vanity, and profit margins are sanity. No city should smugly crow about the sheer volume of visitors through its gates. If tourism is here to stay, then the least cities can do is to sell products that will have the greatest benefit for society. Whether it’s Barcelona, Berlin, Bologna or Bognor, there should be a focus on locally and ethically produced products and services which residents are proud to sell. Tourist boards should work with small businesses that offer creative and original things to do and places to stay, adding breadth to the city’s offering.

The ConversationWhether Barcelona will introduce these ideas will depend on the bravery of politicians and buy-in from the powerful businesses which are happily making short-term profits at the expense of residents and the planet. It is possible to do things differently, and for everyone to benefit more. It may be that the tipping point lies in the age-old mechanics of supply and demand: bear that in mind next time you’re booking a quick city break that looks like it’s only adding to the problem.

Xavier Font is professor of marketing at the University of Surrey.

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.