Podcast: Not a drop to drink

The Islands of Portland, as they'll be if the ice cap melts. Image: Jeffrey Linn.

Round these parts, we talk a lot about roads and trains and houses and parks – all the things you need to make a city, y'know, work.

But on this week's podcast, we're talking about something even more fundamental for the maintenance of urban life: something we take for granted so much, we tend to forget about it altogether. This week, we're talking about water.

On it, you can hear Linda Tirado, the American writer and activist who spent much of January talking to the people occupying a federal wildlife reserve in Oregon. The siege, she tells us, is actually the harbinger of water wars that could one day grip the American West. (She wrote of her adventures for the Daily Beast.)

We also talk to Karim Elgendy, an Egyptian-born architect and sustainability consultant, about the crisis looming in the Middle East. The cities of the Gulf, he explains, are burning oil to desalinate water to extract more oil. He covered this topic for CityMetric back in July.

Lastly, for our map of the week (look, maps make great audio, okay?), we go to the other end of the spectrum, and look at Jeffrey Linn's beautiful maps of how Seattle, Portland and Los Angeles will look when the polar ice caps melt.


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Podcast: Uber & out

Uber no more. Image: Getty.

Oh, capitalism. You had a good run. But then Transport for London decided to ask Uber to take some responsibility for the safety of its passengers, and thus did what 75 years of Soviet Communism failed to do and overthrew the entire economic system of the Western world. Thanks, Sadiq, thanks a lot.

In the unlikely event you've missed the news, the story so far: TfL has ruled that Uber is not a fit and proper company to operate cabs, and revoked its licence. Uber has three weeks to appeal before its cabs need to get off the road.

To commemorate this sad day, I've dragged Stephen Bush back into the podcasting basement, so we can don black arm bands and debate what all this means – for London, for Uber, for the future (if it has one) of capitalism.

May god have mercy on our souls.

Jonn Elledge is the editor of CityMetric. He is on Twitter as @jonnelledge and also has a Facebook page now for some reason. 

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