Podcast: Not a drop to drink

The Islands of Portland, as they'll be if the ice cap melts. Image: Jeffrey Linn.

Round these parts, we talk a lot about roads and trains and houses and parks – all the things you need to make a city, y'know, work.

But on this week's podcast, we're talking about something even more fundamental for the maintenance of urban life: something we take for granted so much, we tend to forget about it altogether. This week, we're talking about water.

On it, you can hear Linda Tirado, the American writer and activist who spent much of January talking to the people occupying a federal wildlife reserve in Oregon. The siege, she tells us, is actually the harbinger of water wars that could one day grip the American West. (She wrote of her adventures for the Daily Beast.)

We also talk to Karim Elgendy, an Egyptian-born architect and sustainability consultant, about the crisis looming in the Middle East. The cities of the Gulf, he explains, are burning oil to desalinate water to extract more oil. He covered this topic for CityMetric back in July.

Lastly, for our map of the week (look, maps make great audio, okay?), we go to the other end of the spectrum, and look at Jeffrey Linn's beautiful maps of how Seattle, Portland and Los Angeles will look when the polar ice caps melt.


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Podcast: SPQR

Rome celebrates its birthday in 2014. Image: Getty.

It’s just me this week, which is a problem, because there’s no one to stop me from indulging his sillier ideas. For example: an entire podcast about Ancient Rome.

Our guest is Kevin Feeney, a historian of the late Roman Empire based at Yale University, Connecticut. He gives us a whistlestop tour of Imperial Rome, with occasional side trips to other ancient cities. We also discuss other important matters such as the nature of Roman emergency services; whether the Emperor Claudius was all that Robert Graves made him out to be; why ancient Britain sucked; and, inevitably, why the whole enterprise fell apart.

Then we round off with the audience participation bit. This week we’re asking: which cities or places from history would you like to visit and why?

The episode itself is below. You can subscribe to the podcast on AcastiTunes, or RSS. Oh – and if you’d like to give us a nice review on iTunes, we’d really like that very much, thanks. Enjoy.

 

Skylines is supported by 100 Resilient Cities. Pioneered by the Rockefeller Foundation, 100RC is dedicated to helping cities around the world become more resilient to the physical, social and economic challenges that are a growing part of the 21st century.

You can find out more at its website.