Podcast: Genius loci

"Wait a minute: that's bus doesn't go there." Image: BBC.

You know, there are some people – mean, cruel, wrong people – who might think our podcast gets a little bit, well, nerdy sometimes. Those people should stop whining and take more of an interest in public transport.

Anyway. This week, to mix things up a bit, we're taking a different approach to things: we're looking at how cities and places are portrayed in literature film and TV.


First up, Barbara talks about her discovery of the surprisingly not made-up phenomenon of Paris syndrome, and we discuss how our perceptions of places are so often shaped by culture.

Then we're joined by Stephanie Boland, a colleague from our New Statesman mothership, who in her other life is in the middle of a PhD in 20th century literature. Together we discuss cities in the works of Shakespeare, Dickens and Joyce and anyone else who comes to mind.

Next, Helen Lewis and Stephen Bush – hosts of our sister show, the New Statesman podcast – pop in to talk about how angry people (read: I) get about on-screen geographical cock ups. And listener Steven Bell tells us about his city, Glasgow.

Finally, for our map of the week we talk about the True Size Map, which enables you to drag countries around the world to see how big they really are. India is massive, look:

The episode itself is at the bottom of this page. Also, you can (and, obviously, should) subscribe on AcastiTunes, or RSS. While we’re at it, we’re still in the market for nice iTunes reviews, so, y’know, you should definitely feel free.

 This week's links...

 
 
 
 

Podcast: Uber & out

Uber no more. Image: Getty.

Oh, capitalism. You had a good run. But then Transport for London decided to ask Uber to take some responsibility for the safety of its passengers, and thus did what 75 years of Soviet Communism failed to do and overthrew the entire economic system of the Western world. Thanks, Sadiq, thanks a lot.

In the unlikely event you've missed the news, the story so far: TfL has ruled that Uber is not a fit and proper company to operate cabs, and revoked its licence. Uber has three weeks to appeal before its cabs need to get off the road.

To commemorate this sad day, I've dragged Stephen Bush back into the podcasting basement, so we can don black arm bands and debate what all this means – for London, for Uber, for the future (if it has one) of capitalism.

May god have mercy on our souls.

Jonn Elledge is the editor of CityMetric. He is on Twitter as @jonnelledge and also has a Facebook page now for some reason. 

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