The newly opened observation deck at the top of NYC's One World Trade Center offers one hell of a view

The view from below: One World Trade Center. Image: Getty.

It's a Friday afternoon, we're all about ready to wind down for the weekend, so let's kick back, relax and look at some pretty pictures of New York City.


Today, the observation deck which tops off New York's One world Trade Center opens to the public. The building occupies the site where the Twin Towers stood until 9/11, and like the taller of its predecessors, stands 1,368 feet tall. Throw in a broadcast mast/faintly gratuitous spire*, though, and that figure rises to 1776 feet, to represent the date of the Declaration of Independence, and the building has become known, inevitably, as the Freedom Tower.

The observation deck, which occupies the 100th, 101st and 102nd floors and highest floor, is not quite the highest such tourist attraction in the world: that honour goes to the one in Dubai's Burj Khalifa, which is on the 148th floor. But it’s pretty high nonetheless, and New York is prettier than Dubai anyway, so here are some pictures.

This one shows the sun rising over Manhattan and Brooklyn this morning:

Here are some of the buildings to the north in the dusk:

Here's the reflection of the early morning light on the Hudson River:

This is the view to the south east. That's Brooklyn, with the Atlantic Ocean beyond it:

The Brooklyn and Manhattan Bridges across the East River:

Someone mopping the floor, as the sun rises over Long Island.

As a bonus, and because we love you, here's time lapse video showing the tower's construction between 2004 and 2013. It's the work EarthCam, who describe themselves as "Webcam Technology Experts". So there you go.

Images: Spencer Platt/Getty.

EDITOR'S NOTE: This article originally placed the observation deck, incorrectly, on the 104th floor. It also failed to identify the purpose of the mast. We thank anonymous hero "Z100Brody" for the corrections, and for the tone in which he communicated them.

 
 
 
 

This fun map allows you to see what a nuclear detonation would do to any city on Earth

A 1971 nuclear test at Mururoa atoll. Image: Getty.

In 1984, the BBC broadcast Threads, a documentary-style drama in which a young Sheffield couple rush to get married because of an unplanned pregnancy, but never quite get round to it because half way through the film the Soviets drop a nuclear bomb on Sheffield. Jimmy, we assume, is killed in the blast (he just disappears, never to be seen again); Ruth survives, but dies of old age 10 years later, while still in her early 30s, leaving her daughter to find for herself in a post-apocalyptic wasteland.

It’s horrifying. It’s so horrifying I’ve never seen the whole thing, even though it’s an incredibly good film which is freely available online, because I once watched the 10 minutes from the middle of the film which show the bomb actually going off and it genuinely gave me nightmares for a month.

In my mind, I suppose, I’d always imagined that being nuked would be a reasonably clean way to go – a bright light, a rushing noise and then whatever happened next wasn’t your problem. Threads taught me that maybe I had a rose-tinted view of nuclear holocaust.

Anyway. In the event you’d like to check what a nuke would do to the real Sheffield, the helpful NukeMap website has the answer.

It shows that dropping a bomb of the same size as the one the US used on Hiroshima in 1945 – a relatively diddly 15kt – would probably kill around 76,500 people:

Those within the central yellow and red circles would be likely to die instantly, due to fireball or air pressure. In the green circle, the radiation would kill at least half the population over a period of hours, days or weeks. In the grey, the thing most likely to kill you would be the collapse of your house, thanks to the air blast, while those in the outer, orange circle would most likely to get away with third degree burns.

Other than that, it’d be quite a nice day.

“Little boy”, the bomb dropped on Hiroshima, was tiny, by the standards of the bombs out there in the world today, of course – but don’t worry, because NukeMap lets you try bigger bombs on for size, too.

The largest bomb in the US arsenal at present is the B-83 which, weighing in at 1.2Mt, is about 80 times the size of Little Boy. Detonate that, and the map has to zoom out, quite a lot.

That’s an estimated 303,000 dead, around a quarter of the population of South Yorkshire. Another 400,000 are injured.

The biggest bomb of all in this fictional arsenal is the USSRS’s 100Mt Tsar Bomba, which was designed but never tested. (The smaller 50MT variety was tested in 1951.) Here’s what that would do:

Around 1.5m dead; 4.7m injured. Bloody hell.

We don’t have to stick to Sheffield, of course. Here’s what the same bomb would do to London:

(Near universal fatalities in zones 1 & 2. Widespread death as far as St Albans and Sevenoaks. Third degree burns in Brighton and Milton Keynes. Over 5.9m dead; another 6m injured.)

Everyone in this orange circle is definitely dead.

Or New York:

(More than 8m dead; another 6.7m injured. Fatalities effectively universal in Lower Manhattan, Downtown Brooklyn, Williamsburg, and Hoboken.)

Or, since it’s the biggest city in the world, Tokyo:

(Nearly 14m dead. Another 14.5m injured. By way of comparison, the estimated death toll of the Hiroshima bombing was somewhere between 90,000 and 146,000.)

I’m going to stop there. But if you’re feeling morbid, you can drop a bomb of any size on any area of earth, just to see what happens.


And whatever you do though: do not watch Threads. Just trust me on this.

Jonn Elledge is the editor of CityMetric. He is on Twitter as @jonnelledge and also has a Facebook page now for some reason. 

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