CityMetric Advent 1: Manchester's 30-year history of creepy giant Santas

The Christmas market in Manchester's Albert Square. Image: Manchester City council.

We love Christmas round here. Bloody love it. Honestly, it's been a constant battle of will not to have that Fairytale of New York (city themed Christmas song, innit) blaring out since about 15 October. Anyway, to celebrate the imminent arrival of our lord Santa, we've decided to do a Christmas themed post every day until the big day. Think of it as a sort of advent calendar, only with municipal government policy instead of chocolate.

To kick us off, we've decided to take a look at Manchester's long and distinguished history of oh my god what is that thing my god it's eating the mayor.

Image courtesy of Luke Montague on Flickr, licenced under creative commons.

Installing the giant Santa on the side of the Town Hall has been a Mancunian tradition since the mid 1980s. The city's first Santa came in the form of an 80-foot blow up doll, which clung to the corner of the clock tower like he really, really liked it:

Image courtesy of Manchester Archives+ on Flickr, licenced under creative commons.

That one, in the words of the Manchester Evening News:

was pensioned off because after six years he was “worn out and shabby”.

But even before then he had suffered the indignity of losing air on several occasions and had to undergo frequent surgery to repair him.

Stone gargoyles were responsible for wounding Santa on at least two occasions.

Gotta watch those gargoyles.

After a while, then, he was replaced by this guy, who looks much jollier, at least until he gets hungry.

Image courtesy of Duncan Hull on Flickr, licenced under creative commons.

That Santa, too, was retired in 2007. These days, the city instead uses a giant illuminated yellow chap:

Image courtesy of Raver Mikey on Flickr, licenced under creative commons.

He’s affectionately known as the "Zippy Santa", after a certain kid's TV character.

Image courtesy of Raver Mikey on Flickr, licenced under creative commons.

This Santa, luckily, isn't nightmarish in any way, so-

Image courtesy of Constant Weader on Flickr, licenced under creative commons.


Yeah, so anyway, if you have kids, maybe best to avoid Manchester city centre for the next few weeks, eh?

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Brexit is an opportunity for cities to take back control

Leeds Town Hall. Image: Getty.

The Labour leader of Leeds City Council on the future of Britain’s cities.

As the negotiations about the shape of the UK’s exit from the EU continue, Britain’s most economically powerful cities outside London are arguing that the UK can be made stronger for Brexit – by allowing cities to “take back control” of service provision though new powers and freedoms

Core Cites UK, the representative voice of the cities at the centre of the ten largest economic areas outside London, has just launched an updated version of our green paper, ‘Invest Reform Trust’. The document calls for radical but deliverable proposals to allow cities to prepare for Brexit by boosting their productivity, and helping to rebalance the economy by supporting inclusive economic growth across the UK.

Despite representing areas responsible for a quarter of the UK’s economy and nearly a third of exports, city leaders have played little part in the development of the government’s approach to Brexit. Cities want a dialogue with the government on their Brexit plans and a new settlement which sees power passing from central government to local communities.

To help us deliver a Brexit that works for the UK’s cities, we are opening a dialogue with the EU Commission’s Chief Negotiator Michel Barnier to share our views of the Brexit process and what our cities want to achieve.

Most of the changes the Core Cities want to see can already be delivered by the UK. To address the fact that the productivity of UK cities lags behind competitors, we need to think differently and begin to address the structural problems in our economy before Brexit.

International evidence shows that cities which have the most control over taxes raised in their area tend to be the most productive.  The UK is significantly out of step with international competitors in the power given to cities and we are one of the most centralised countries in the world.  


Boosting the productivity of the UK’s Core Cities to the UK national average would increase the country’s national income by £70-£90bn a year. This would be a critical boost to the UK’s post-Brexit economic success.

Our green paper is clear that one-size fits all policy solutions simply can’t deal with the complexities of 21st century Britain. We need a place-based approach that looks at challenges and solutions in a different way, focused on the particular needs of local communities and local economies.

For example, our Core Cities face levels of unemployment higher than the national average, but also face shortages of skilled workers.  We need a more localised approach to skills, education and employment support with greater involvement from local democratic and business leaderships to deliver the skills to support growth in each area.

The UK will only make a success of Brexit if we are able to increase our international trade. Evidence shows city to city networks play an important role in boosting international trade.  The green paper calls for a new partnership with the Department of International trade to develop an Urban Trade programme across the UK’s cities and give cities more of a role in international trade missions.

To deliver economic growth that includes all areas of the UK, we also need to invest in our infrastructure. Not just our physical infrastructure of roads, rail telecommunications and so forth, but also our health, education and care infrastructure, ensuring that we are able to unlock the potential of our core assets, our people.

Whether you think that Brexit is a positive or a negative thing for the UK, it is clear that the process will be a challenging one.  Cities have a key role to play in delivering a good Brexit: one that sees local communities empowered and economic prosperity across all areas of the UK.

Cllr Judith Blake is leader of Leeds City Council.