China's secondhand smog blows into Seoul

Image: Getty.

Seoul has a pretty impressive skyline – at least, most of the time. Last month, it all but vanished, as a blanket of pollution blew over the city from western Asia. Known as "yellow dust", the pollution is made up of sand picked up by wind over north China and Mongolia and blown eastwards.

South Korea's dose of yellow dust in late February was one of the worst on record: the authorities issued a health warning in Seoul and several nearby cities, while weather forecasters advised residents to stay inside with windows and doors shut.

This lone Seoulite, however, disregarded the warnings to snap a smog selfie on the riverfront. We've taken the liberty of producing an artist's impression of the resulting photo:

Worth it.

 
 
 
 

Quiz: Can you name the UK city from a map of its public transport?

I'm so confused. Image: Chris Sharp.

Come on, this is an easy one.

 

 

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